Breivik custody extended with concessions / News / The Foreigner

Breivik custody extended with concessions. UPDATE: As Oslo District Court has decided Anders Behring Breivik's trial will start on 16 April next year, it has given the accused terrorist a further 12 weeks custody in Ila Prison today but lifted some restrictions. At the remand hearing, the judge found there is “still a real and immediate danger the accused could tamper with evidence”, and that it was possible he received help in carrying out his acts of terror. Nonetheless, this last point has not been proven so far. Breivik will also be eligible for approved visits and correspondence for the next 8 weeks. The Court also ruled a current enforced ban on Internet and newspapers could be lifted as early as 12 December unless this was appealed. If successful, the ban could last the entire new period of custody.

andersbehringbreivik, oslodistrictcourtremandhearing, breivikmaintrial



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Breivik custody extended with concessions

Published on Monday, 14th November, 2011 at 14:59 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 14th November 2011 at 19:38.

UPDATE: As Oslo District Court has decided Anders Behring Breivik's trial will start on 16 April next year, it has given the accused terrorist a further 12 weeks custody in Ila Prison today but lifted some restrictions.

Oslo District Courthouse (illus. ph.)
Oslo District Courthouse (illus. ph.)
Photo: WireImage/Ragnar Singsaas/Contributor


At the remand hearing, the judge found there is “still a real and immediate danger the accused could tamper with evidence”, and that it was possible he received help in carrying out his acts of terror. Nonetheless, this last point has not been proven so far.

Breivik will also be eligible for approved visits and correspondence for the next 8 weeks. The Court also ruled a current enforced ban on Internet and newspapers could be lifted as early as 12 December unless this was appealed. If successful, the ban could last the entire new period of custody.

Reading out today's ruling, Judge Torkjel Nesheim said, “The Court finds 12 weeks is not a disproportionate intervention, and continued remand has been adequately justified. A new hearing after 4 or 8 weeks is not considered relevant.”

Today’s proceedings, convened just before 11:00, were different to Breivik’s previous ones. A ban on court reporting was lifted, and it was also open for aggrieved and the media.

Breivik was dressed in a dark suit, white shirt, and grey tie, denying the press opportunities to take his picture. According to NRK, he alleged the judge had a conflict of interests as he was supported by multiculturalists, and Breivik had to be told to stand with the rest of the court when the hearing was preliminarily adjourned.

The 32-year-old, who talked in controlled tones, had also tried to speak to those who lived following his Utøya shooting spree at the start of the hearing, at times exhibiting a hint of a smile. Judge Nesheim had to interrupt him on several occasions.

"I am commander and a Knights Templar," said the perpetrator. Several Utøya survivors left the courtroom.

Breivik, described by Telemark Labour Youth (AUF)  leader Tim Viskjer as “cold and inhuman” arrived at the courthouse entrance in a white van at approximately 10:00  after leaving Ila Prison about 40 minutes earlier.

Armed police were guarding the building, and had previously searched for bombs with the aid of dogs. Organisation SOS Rasism demonstrated outside, protesting that there should be “no speaker’s platform for fascists.”

Before the hearing, Breivik said he acknowledged his actions but not his guilt and would be demanding his release. His main trail will start on Monday 16 April 2012 in Oslo District Court.



Published on Monday, 14th November, 2011 at 14:59 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 14th November 2011 at 19:38.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, oslodistrictcourtremandhearing, breivikmaintrial.





  
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