Breivik trial Day 28: In which Breivik is compared with Himmler / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Breivik trial Day 28: In which Breivik is compared with Himmler. On day 28 of the trial of Anders Behring Breivik, the court heard from Terje Emberland from the Holocaust Centre in Oslo. Emberland is a professor of religion and an expert in extreme right-wing ideologies. He has analysed the ideological sections of Breivik's manifesto or “compendium”, and testified that Breivik's beliefs can best be characterised as fascistic. He criticised the first psychiatric report about Breivik, which found him to be criminally insane, for excluding the political framework to his actions. “These beliefs may appear rather bizarre,” he told the court, “but that can be explained... by their historical context.”

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Breivik trial Day 28: In which Breivik is compared with Himmler

Published on Monday, 4th June, 2012 at 19:52 under the news category, by Ben McPherson.

On day 28 of the trial of Anders Behring Breivik, the court heard from Terje Emberland from the Holocaust Centre in Oslo.



Emberland is a professor of religion and an expert in extreme right-wing ideologies. He has analysed the ideological sections of Breivik's manifesto or “compendium”, and testified that Breivik's beliefs can best be characterised as fascistic.

He criticised the first psychiatric report about Breivik, which found him to be criminally insane, for excluding the political framework to his actions. “These beliefs may appear rather bizarre,” he told the court, “but that can be explained... by their historical context.”

He compared Breivik's beliefs with those of Heinrich Himmler of the SS, saying that the main difference between the two men was that Himmler demonised Jews, whilst Breivik believed his enemy to be Muslims. Both were obsessed with the image of the medieval knight.

“Breivik says he acts through love of his people. The SS man is supposed to be a perfect self-sacrificing knight on behalf of his people, liberated from responsibility as an individual,” Emberland explained to the court.

“The ideal of the knight is not just to sacrifice oneself, but also [to sacrifice] morality. In this way the notion of martyrdom becomes central to National Socialist ideology... He is defending the Germanic race's existence against the threat of destruction from foreign races.”

Psychiatrist Agnar Aspaas asked him to comment on Breivik's obsession with uniform and theatrical behaviour.

“We recognise that from Fascism,” replied Emberland. “Symbols, rigid hierarchies and rankings: the SS was full of this stuff... A whole range of things that give this a pseudo-religious character.”

“Do you know what brought someone over the boundary, so they commit such acts on their own?” asked Synne Søreide, another member of the psychiatric team.

“No, that's where the boundary is for me as a historian,” replied Emberland.

Three other expert witnesses testified on the political context of Breivik's beliefs and his use of drugs on the day he committed the murders.



Published on Monday, 4th June, 2012 at 19:52 under the news category, by Ben McPherson.

This post has the following tags: andersbehringbreivik, breiviktrialoslo, oslodistrictcourt, utoeyashootings, utoya.





  
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