Child psychologist advocates holiday Internet / News / The Foreigner

Child psychologist advocates holiday Internet. Banning PCs and mobiles on holiday may stress your children and ruin your rest, a Norwegian psychologist claims. “Children who normally spend a lot of time in front of a PC or hours playing computer games can become restless and anxious. They suffer from some kind of information withdrawal syndrome,” Elisabeth Gerhardsen tells NRK, saying relaxing in this way is what many schoolchildren know best. Her statements support findings from a previous study led by The University of Maryland's International Center for Media and the Public Agenda (ICMPA), called Unplugged.

technologyaddiction, irritableholidaychildren



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Child psychologist advocates holiday Internet

Published on Monday, 4th July, 2011 at 12:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Banning PCs and mobiles on holiday may stress your children and ruin your rest, a Norwegian psychologist claims.

Apple iPad and computer
Apple iPad and computer
Photo: smokingapples.com/Flickr


“Children who normally spend a lot of time in front of a PC or hours playing computer games can become restless and anxious. They suffer from some kind of information withdrawal syndrome,” Elisabeth Gerhardsen tells NRK, saying relaxing in this way is what many schoolchildren know best.

Her statements support findings from a previous study led by The University of Maryland's International Center for Media and the Public Agenda (ICMPA), called Unplugged.

Earlier this year, scientists from several countries conducted an research on volunteers belonging to the so-called ‘Facebook generation’.

Subjects from 12 universities had no iPods, mobile phones, the Internet, TV, radio, and newspapers for 24 hours, could only read books or use landlines, and wrote their experiences down in a diary. Researchers say many described symptoms such as giving up smoking or hard drug users’ ‘cold turkey’.

“Participants described feeling fidgety and kept reaching for their mobile phones even when they weren't there,” Dr Roman Gerodimos, a lecturer in communication at the Bournemouth University who led the UK part of the study, told The Telegraph.

“In their reflections on what they had been through, people freely admitted that they were experiencing symptoms of withdrawal... The words addiction kept recurring.”

Researchers were surprised how dependant people have become on technology, and describe the condition as Information Deprivation Disorder.

Child psychologist Elisabeth Gerhardsen recommends parents set mutually agreed limits on how long and when their children spend time in front of their PCs on holiday, for example two hours, instead of giving in to “irritable and pestering youngsters”.

“It’s a good idea to help them keep to these too and a much better solution than sitting in a chair waiting for them to become irritable, or end up with some other square-shaped, battery-powered thing as a replacement for a PC.”



Published on Monday, 4th July, 2011 at 12:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: technologyaddiction, irritableholidaychildren.





  
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