Children pick private over free education / News / The Foreigner

Children pick private over free education. Opposition politicians in Norway argue officials should focus more on the education system as more students apply for private schools. Sven Harberg MP, the Conservatives’ (H) representative on the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Education, Research, and Church Affairs, criticises the government for failing the education system. In 2007, the government announced its policy to slow private schooling development in a move to encourage more children to study free in state schools. Statistics now show the policy has backfired.

norwaystateeducationsystem, privateschooling



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Children pick private over free education

Published on Monday, 5th September, 2011 at 11:31 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last Updated on 5th September 2011 at 12:48.

Opposition politicians in Norway argue officials should focus more on the education system as more students apply for private schools.

Pencil and pen collection
Pencil and pen collection
Photo: Sleeping Sun/Flickr


Sven Harberg MP, the Conservatives’ (H) representative on the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Education, Research, and Church Affairs, criticises the government for failing the education system.

In 2007, the government announced its policy to slow private schooling development in a move to encourage more children to study free in state schools. Statistics now show the policy has backfired.

Mr Harberg’s comments come following this summer’s steep rise in pupils wanting to attend private schools.

“Minister Kristin Halvorsen (SV) constantly attacks the Conservatives for saying we want to have the private sector as an option. Young people have responded by applying to these alternatives. I think the minister should now consider this seriously,” Mr Harberg tells NRK.

Principal Michael Brekke of Sonans 6th-Form College in Oslo said 2011’s applicant numbers are a record compared to previous years. A place costs 10,000 kroner.

“We struggled to fill places in 2010, but many are on the waiting list this year.”

Two Sonans students, Rakshana Sriskandarajah and Maryam Muhsen explain why they decided to opt for private education.

“I feel I get better advice here. There are small classes, which means that we know all our contemporaries and the teachers very well,” says Ms Sriskandarajah.

Ms Muhsen explains, “Of course it [10,000 kroner] is a lot of money, but I am securing myself a good future and feel that I get a lot for my money here.”

Staff at another private institution, Akademiet, say over 2,900 have applied for 800 places in Oslo and Sandnes.

The increased number of students hoping to learn in private schools is a trend that has hit other places in Norway, including Bergen, Drammen, Molde and Ålesund.

Meanwhile, Norway’s state education system is still considered to be one of the best in the world.




Published on Monday, 5th September, 2011 at 11:31 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last updated on 5th September 2011 at 12:48.

This post has the following tags: norwaystateeducationsystem, privateschooling.





  
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