Clouds on the horizon for Norway / News / The Foreigner

Clouds on the horizon for Norway. “Bad times in the EU mean bad times for us,” says Jonas Gahr Støre. Norway’s possible EU membership prospects are on the wane. A wave of financial protectionism and inter-nation disagreement has hit the Union in the wake of the financial crisis. Just 30 percent of Norwegians are in favour of joining the EU according to results of March’s opinion poll carried out on behalf of NRK. An eight percent drop in one month.

eu, financial, crisis, membership, norway, greece, germany, jonas, gahr, stoere, foreign, minister, parliament



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Clouds on the horizon for Norway

Published on Tuesday, 23rd March, 2010 at 11:24 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

“Bad times in the EU mean bad times for us,” says Jonas Gahr Støre.

Jonas Gahr Støre
Jonas Gahr Støre
Photo: Ministry of Foreign Affairs/Flickr


Problematic

Norway’s possible EU membership prospects are on the wane. A wave of financial protectionism and inter-nation disagreement has hit the Union in the wake of the financial crisis.

Just 30 percent of Norwegians are in favour of joining the EU according to results of March’s opinion poll carried out on behalf of NRK. An eight percent drop in one month.

“When things are going well in Norway, it’s worse news for the EU lobby,” said Foreign Minister Jonas Gahr Støre in today’s “Politisk kvarter” on NRK.

Norway has been relatively unaffected by the global recession, but there’s a new world economic order, with China and Asia gaining more power.

Støre believes this will cause problems both at home and for the Nordic Countries, because the G8 will be replaced by the G20. Neither Norway nor the Nordic Countries are members.

Solidarity

Ine Marie Eriksen Søreide, leader of the Parliamentary Committee on Foreign Affairs, said she believes the financial crisis has led to increased international protectionism.

“It’s had a major impact on the international arena. We need common economic rules, whilst preserving Norwegian interests at the same time.

European solidarity is also under threat, after Germany’s proposal to exclude countries that abuse financial support schemes, mentioning Greece.

Asia’s and China’s economic growth, their appalling record of human rights abuse, as well as the global recession also give Norway multiple economic solidarity dilemmas.

“We shall have an economic relationship to both China and Asia. But we also have a responsibility, first and foremost our connections with Iceland, the Nordic Countries, and the Baltic. Many countries are experiencing high deficits and considerable debt. The lights are blinking red for many states,” said Søreide.

“The global recession has benefitted some new countries, and pulled down others. Bad times in the EU mean bad times for us,” Støre said.



Published on Tuesday, 23rd March, 2010 at 11:24 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: eu, financial, crisis, membership, norway, greece, germany, jonas, gahr, stoere, foreign, minister, parliament.





  
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