Coalition parties’ popularity dwindles / News / The Foreigner

Coalition parties’ popularity dwindles. “We’ve got to do a better job,” says deputy leader of the Socialist Left (SV). Things have looked better for the red-green coalition government. A fresh poll shows the Right is on the march. SV’s deputy leader, Audun Lysbakken, tells NRK he thinks the government has a job to do.Winter of discontent The Centre (Sp), Socialist Left (SV), and Labour (AP) Parties are losing their grip on the voters. Norstat’s latest opinion poll shows a clear shift to the Right, with a 6.4 percent drop for the coalition compared with February’s.

labour, ap, socialist, left, sv, centre, party, sp, jens, stoltenberg, prime, minister, voters, popularity, sinking, socialist



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Coalition parties’ popularity dwindles

Published on Thursday, 18th March, 2010 at 12:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 18th March 2010 at 14:30.

“We’ve got to do a better job,” says deputy leader of the Socialist Left (SV).

LED traffic lights
The amber light is lit for the red-green coallitionLED traffic lights
Photo: Petey21/Wikimedia Commons


Things have looked better for the red-green coalition government. A fresh poll shows the Right is on the march. SV’s deputy leader, Audun Lysbakken, tells NRK he thinks the government has a job to do.

Winter of discontent

The Centre (Sp), Socialist Left (SV), and Labour (AP) Parties are losing their grip on the voters. Norstat’s latest opinion poll shows a clear shift to the Right, with a 6.4 percent drop for the coalition compared with February’s.

Labour comes out worst, having lost 4.9 percent in February, and 6.5 percent since last year’s General Election. Bad news for the Prime Minister, Jens Stoltenberg.

Dagsavisen’s acting Editor in Chief, Arne Strand, believes things are dramatic for Labour.

“The Centre is about to disappear as a political heavyweight. The government’s handling of the financial crisis has apparently been forgotten. Dissatisfaction about the government not living up to expectations is about to take root,” he writes in his commentary today.

Whilst Magnus Takvam, NRK’s political commentator, believes Labour has handled things badly.

“They’ve had a period with many negative issues. This includes sick pay, radical Islam, the railways, and infrastructure, he says.

Cuts

Takvam thinks the government has also lost popularity by warning of possible budget cuts – to transport, child benefit, and foreign aid – in order to save jobs, keep interest rates low, control rising public sector costs, and returning to the Oil Fund’s (the State Petroleum Fund) so-called four percent fiscal rule.

The Progress Party’s (FrP) leader, Siv Jensen, also thinks this is why Labour’s popularity has dwindled.

“I believe Labour’s percentage reduction is because they don’t have answers to the country’s challenges. The government is fumbling around on the budget, and comes with some nonsense about the fiscal rule. Labour also doesn’t have solutions to the integration challenge,” she tells Dagsavisen.

The poll shows FrP’s popularity has increased by 1.6 percent, and the Party has been in the news recently about banning minarets, as well as burkas and niqabs in public, and hijabs in schools.

Election expert Bent Aardal believes Labour’s planned budget cuts have created insecurity amongst former Labour voters.

“It can have put them back on the fence. Many have got the impression that the good times are over,” he says.

Whilst Erna Solberg, leader of the Conservative Party (H) – which has gained four percent since last month – thinks it’s not about cuts, but Labour’s “whimpering” and “yapping”.

“They can’t manage to have a debate without beginning a sentence with “we have allocated x amount more money than the non-Socialist government managed” etc. The voters have had enough,” says Solberg.

Action?

Labour’s deputy leader, Helge Pedersen, admits she’s got no explanation for the latest results, however, but says the government has to do something that is right, both economically, and employment-wise.

“There’s been a lot of focus recently on tightening the economy and possible cuts in next year’s budget. It’s not exactly something that gets voters’ hearts beating.”

But Arne Strand thinks the government’s at idle.

“There’s a lot of talk, and little action,” he writes.



Published on Thursday, 18th March, 2010 at 12:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 18th March 2010 at 14:30.

This post has the following tags: labour, ap, socialist, left, sv, centre, party, sp, jens, stoltenberg, prime, minister, voters, popularity, sinking, socialist.





  
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