Culture Minister regrets IOC Women’s Ski Jumping delay / News / The Foreigner

Culture Minister regrets IOC Women’s Ski Jumping delay. Women may have to continue looking on whilst their male counterparts soar at the 2014 Winter Olympics at Sochi in Russia. At its current meeting in Acapulco in Mexico, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has postponed making a decision about including Women’s ski jumping as a sport once again. This has disappointed Norway’s Minister of Culture Anniken Huitfeldt. “I think it is a pity the IOC does not give women’s Ski Jumping the green light. I am convinced it would have increased recruitment [to the sport], and given us a really good competition at the Olympic Winter Games in 2014,” she tells NRK.

anniken, huitfeldt, ski, jumping, women, international, olympic, committee, acapulco, mexico, sochi, russia, winter, gerhard, heiberg, annette, sagen, line, jahr, clas, brede, braathen



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Culture Minister regrets IOC Women’s Ski Jumping delay

Published on Tuesday, 26th October, 2010 at 11:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Women may have to continue looking on whilst their male counterparts soar at the 2014 Winter Olympics at Sochi in Russia.

New Holmenkollen ski jump
New Holmenkollen ski jump
Photo: Egil/Creative Commons


A shame

At its current meeting in Acapulco in Mexico, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has postponed making a decision about including Women’s ski jumping as a sport once again. This has disappointed Norway’s Minister of Culture Anniken Huitfeldt.

“I think it is a pity the IOC does not give women’s Ski Jumping the green light. I am convinced it would have increased recruitment [to the sport], and given us a really good competition at the Olympic Winter Games in 2014,” she tells NRK.

Before the weekend, Norwegian IOC Board Member Gerhard Heiberg was hopeful the matter would be settled, but now says the committee wants to await the outcome of the World Skiing Championships at Holmenkollen in Oslo at the beginning of next year instead.

“We have agreed to allow Women’s Ski Jumping in principle...but we would like to see the results [first].”

Court case

This is not the first time the IOC has attracted criticism. 15 women ski jumpers, including Norway’s Annette Sagen, challenged the committee’s decision not to allow the sport at this year’s Winter Olympics in Canada.

Sagen took bronze at the first ever Women’s Ski Jumping Championships, organised as part of the International Ski Federation’s (FIS) 2009 Nordic World Skiing Championships in Liberec.

The ski jumpers sued the IOC, whose decision Heiberg supported, demanding either the sport be included, or that Men’s Ski Jumping be removed from the games. Canada’s High Court eventually dismissed the case.

Progress?

Yesterday’s IOC announcement has mystified Norwegian ski jumper Line Jahr.

“I do not understand why [the committee] has postponed [its decision] yet again. They have no other possibility than to let us jump, and there have been quite considerable developments in Women’s Ski Jumping in the last two years alone.”

Clas Brede Bråthen, head of Norway’s national Ski Jumping Team, was mildly in favour of allowing the sport into the Olympics.

“I think the women have progressed quite a bit and are beginning to catch the men up regarding the quality of competitiveness,” he says.

Whilst Minister Huitfeldt remains optimistic and believes “it will take a bit of time, just as it has done before, but I am convinced Women’s ski Jumping will become an Olympic discipline,” Line Jahr is not convinced, however.

“I have never seen [the IOC] on the ski jump when I have competed, so perhaps they should take a trip to see and discover there are women here with a high standard of ski jumping who should also get the chance to display [their skills] at the Olympics,” she says.



Published on Tuesday, 26th October, 2010 at 11:37 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: anniken, huitfeldt, ski, jumping, women, international, olympic, committee, acapulco, mexico, sochi, russia, winter, gerhard, heiberg, annette, sagen, line, jahr, clas, brede, braathen.





  
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