Doctors consider severe obesity surgery for adolescents / News / The Foreigner

Doctors consider severe obesity surgery for adolescents. Norway’s 13 to 18-year-olds could be offered these procedures on a permanent basis should clinical trials succeed. The proposed move comes following the 4XL research project conducted at eastern Norway’s Vestfold Hospital. Its main aim is to see whether surgical treatment is more beneficial to health instead of a change in lifestyle.

medicine, operations, obesity, weight, surgery, children, paywall



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Doctors consider severe obesity surgery for adolescents

Published on Tuesday, 28th June, 2016 at 14:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Norway’s 13 to 18-year-olds could be offered these procedures on a permanent basis should clinical trials succeed.

Bathroom scales
Bathroom scales
Photo: Mason Masteka/Flickr/Creative Commons


The proposed move comes following the 4XL research project conducted at eastern Norway’s Vestfold Hospital.

Its main aim is to see whether surgical treatment is more beneficial to health instead of a change in lifestyle.

Child health experts have already warned of a possible child obesity epidemic, fearing that one in four children could be overweight by 2025. Efforts to increase physical exercise at school have faltered.

Vestfold Hospital’s 4XL research project offers two options to adolescents suffering from severe obesity: either an operation to treat the medical condition, or intensive follow-ups at the facility’s outpatient clinic – which focuses on lifestyle changes.

Some 30 children have participated in the initiative since 2010. Patients are followed for a period of 10 years in connection with the procedure.

“Obesity, which leads high blood pressure, has become such a problem for some adolescents that one cannot help them using any other method,” Dr Shamira Lekhal, chief physician at Vestfold Hospital’s Centre for the Severely Obese tells NRK P4.

Those with a BMI (Body Mass Index) of over 30 are classified as being obese. The diagnosis of severe obesity applies to people with a BMI of more than 35.

“We’ve received 80 applications [for treatment], some from children as young as 13. However, over 50 of these have been turned down because they’re not adequately mentally prepared to undergo surgery,” explains Dr Lekhal

The procedure is not without its hazards. According to her, there is an increased risk of suicide and substance abuse.

“Adolescents are also more prone to being unable to handle the operation than adults are in cases where there is a pre-existing psychological condition,” she explains.

The general Norwegian population, including sailors, has also been found to be losing the battle of the bulge due to an unhealthy lifestyle. Healthy eating advice served by authorities has attracted criticism in the past.

Moreover, a 2014 inquiry concluded that physical exercise can increase physiological stress for the obese, making it more difficult for them to shed weight.



Published on Tuesday, 28th June, 2016 at 14:39 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: medicine, operations, obesity, weight, surgery, children, paywall.





  
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