Few foreign acquaintances for Norwegians / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Few foreign acquaintances for Norwegians. Only just over half of ethnic Norwegians have close acquaintances with those from an immigrant background, a recent study shows. The NRK-commissioned Norstat poll, carried out in connection with TV series “Norsk Nok?” (Norwegian Enough?), revealed this figure to be 56 percent. In the Norwegian broadcaster’s program, ethnic Norwegians and Norwegians of immigrant backgrounds explore what it means to be Norwegian today.

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Few foreign acquaintances for Norwegians

Published on Friday, 1st November, 2013 at 11:41 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 1st November 2013 at 13:16.

Only just over half of ethnic Norwegians have close acquaintances with those from an immigrant background, a recent study shows.



The NRK-commissioned Norstat poll, carried out in connection with TV series “Norsk Nok?” (Norwegian Enough?), revealed this figure to be 56 percent.

In the Norwegian broadcaster’s program, ethnic Norwegians and Norwegians of immigrant backgrounds explore what it means to be Norwegian today.

‘Close acquaintances’ in this case are defined as people with whom there is regular contact, such as neighbors, colleagues, and friends.

“Disappointing”

Researcher Jon Rogstad at the Fafo Research Foundation expressed disappointment over the results.

He believes that the number of people who have close acquaintances of immigrant background should be higher, saying “it’s sad more people don’t have more predominant contact.”

Moreover, Norwegian integration policy has largely turned a blind eye to on the issue of work, according to him. 

“Being integrated in Norway means having a job, which is by all means extremely important,” he told the Norwegian broadcaster.

“But we’ve been blinded by the fact that they will be ‘Norwegian’ if only we get them into working life. But many with immigrant backgrounds have taken up jobs that Norwegians don’t want […] and only carry out their daily assignments together with other minorities.”

Go West, but not East

Regarding companies that call themselves multicultural, Mr. Rogstad stated this is misleading “just because they have 14 different nationalities under one roof if all are on different floors.”

1,000 ethnic Norwegians took part in the NRK-Norstat poll. Some of the respondents with foreign-origin acquaintances answered that most seemed to be come from Nordic or Western European countries – 48 and 25 percent, respectively.

Figures for those with Asian, African, and Middle Eastern acquaintances were 19 percent, 17 percent, and 13 percent.

Meanwhile, other reports say that there are a decreasing number of jobs in the Norwegian capital.

A recent Statistics Norway (SSB) study has revealed labor migrants are leaving Oslo and moving to where the money and demand is, for example to work in western Norway’s oil industry.

Good things come in foreign packages                                 

Whilst Norwegian employer’s skepticism to foreigners remains, earlier this year, Stavanger Aftenblad wrote Aker Solutions have some 1,400 of 84 different nationalities working for them.

Oil companies Norske Shell, Conocophillips, Maersk and Dong also occasionally go abroad to find the necessary expertise, with foreigner numbers at Statoil rising too.

According to Fafo’s Jon Rogstad, Norwegians are fond of appearing culturally tolerant and enjoy the exoticism and charm of other countries. He also tells NRK that Norwegians they tend to feel slightly threatened when traditional norms in their own country are broken.   

“Norway is an egalitarian society, but we have a major dilemma here: people must be as diverse as they wish, just as long as you are like I am,” he said.

“Nevertheless, the fact is that diverse Norway is a package deal containing many different things, some good, and some less so, and you can’t just choose the parts you want. You can’t have the Thai food but not the people,” concluded Mr. Rogstad.




Published on Friday, 1st November, 2013 at 11:41 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 1st November 2013 at 13:16.

This post has the following tags: foreignersnorway, worknorway.





  
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