Final stage for Nobel Peace Prize winner decision / News / The Foreigner

Final stage for Nobel Peace Prize winner decision. Norway’s Nobel Committee will decide today who will be awarded this year’s Peace Prize. The Committee says 241 individuals, of which 53 are organisations, have been nominated this year, setting a new record. As usual, there are many speculations, but it is believed the frontrunners are likely to be those that stood out during the Arab Spring.

nobelpeaceprizenominations, wikileaks



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Final stage for Nobel Peace Prize winner decision

Published on Friday, 30th September, 2011 at 11:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 30th September 2011 at 11:46.

Norway’s Nobel Committee will decide today who will be awarded this year’s Peace Prize.

Nobel Institute Oslo
Nobel Institute Oslo
Photo: L. Shyamal/Wikimedia Commons


The Committee says 241 individuals, of which 53 are organisations, have been nominated this year, setting a new record.

As usual, there are many speculations, but it is believed the frontrunners are likely to be those that stood out during the Arab Spring.

Kristian Berg Harpviken, Director of Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO), has shortlisted five. Two of them are Israa Abdel Fattah and the April 6th Youth Movement, and Wael GhonimGoogle’s ex Middle Eastern marketing manager, who cooperated with Google engineers to develop a way allowing protesters to communicate and send messages while Egyptian authorities were closing down Internet connections country-wide. Mr Ghonim was held in custody for 11 days following his arrest.

He believes that “two basic issues will be central to the committee in its deliberations for the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize. The wave of uprisings – in several cases followed by regime change – that has swept across North Africa and the Middle East, is the most significant political development of the year. The current committee has emphasized its wish to be relevant, to speak to dominant themes of the present, and to see the prize giving leverage in unfolding processes.”

“Secondly, the prize should be awarded to a female leader or activist who has been an innovator of new tools for bringing about peace. With only two out of the ten last prizes going to women (and only ten prizes in history), it would be important to set a new trend for the second decade of this millennium. A prize to somebody who has made a significant contribution to the prevention, amelioration or resolution of armed conflict would be firmly in line with the spirit of Alfred Nobel’s will,” PRIO writes.

Mr Harpviken’s other main theories are Lina Ben Mhenni, the Human Rights Society Memorial and founding member Svetlana Gannushkina, and Prince Ghazi bin Mohammad of the Jordanian Royal Family.

NRK reports Committee Leader Thorbjørn Jagland thinks it is important both for the prize and the winner "that it hits the zeitgeist”, upholding his fearlessness of being political, or creating trouble and controversy.

Left-Wing MP Snorre Valen has reaffirmed his WikiLeaks and Julian Assange nomination, which caught the organisation by surprise earlier this year.

Meanwhile, Kristian Berg Harpviken has also called for a change as to how the five-member Nobel Committee is appointed. Whilst Alfred Nobel’s will has given Parliament the mandate, he argues it fails to specify instructions for the selection process.

In a commentary published in Aftenposten last year, he said,The Nobel Peace Prize is considered one of the world’s strongest symbols; the prize shapes the public agenda and gives voice to peace activists all over the world. Members of the prize-awarding Nobel Committee are appointed by their political parties in the Storting, the Parliament of Norway. This strong link to Norwegian party politics threatens the legitimacy of the prize, and it is high time the Norwegian Storting changes its procedures and includes both experts and internationals in the committee.”

His suggestion has received support from Labour MP Svein Roald Hansen, Deputy Speaker and MP Akhtar Chaudry for the Socialist Left (SV), and Progress Party (FrP) MP Øyvind Korsberg. Yesterday, Labour Party Secretary Raymond Johansen added to the calls, claiming "it's important the prize is perceived as an independent peace prize and not an expression of Norwegian foreign policy."

"Personally, I believe it is both legitimate and necessary to initiate a discussion about the composition and selection of the Nobel Committee," he told Dagens Naæringsliv.

The Nobel Committee will announce its Peace Prize decision next Friday.



Published on Friday, 30th September, 2011 at 11:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 30th September 2011 at 11:46.

This post has the following tags: nobelpeaceprizenominations, wikileaks.





  
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