Folk music festival strikes a sour note / News / The Foreigner

Folk music festival strikes a sour note. Students are often blamed for partying noisily all hours of the night, but some in mid-Norway’s Steinkjer had to flee to local hotels to escape what they say is pestilential accordion music. The national folk music dancing festival’s noise levels were reportedly so high, that affected students in nearby university college housing complained on the accommodation facility’s Facebook page. “I’m sure that the accordion is the ultimate torture method following three nights with minimal sleep due to what you enthusiastically call “music”. I definitely would have divulged state secrets in the coming 24 hours (If I’d known any),” Lisa Archana Jorgensen wrote.

folkmusic, norway, dancing



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Folk music festival strikes a sour note

Published on Saturday, 19th July, 2014 at 13:27 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 19th July 2014 at 13:37.

Students are often blamed for partying noisily all hours of the night, but some in mid-Norway’s Steinkjer had to flee to local hotels to escape what they say is pestilential accordion music.

Red accordion
Notes from this type of instrument were not music to students' ears.Red accordion
Photo: objectsforall/Shutterstock Images


The national folk music dancing festival’s noise levels were reportedly so high, that affected students in nearby university college housing complained on the accommodation facility’s Facebook page.

“I’m sure that the accordion is the ultimate torture method following three nights with minimal sleep due to what you enthusiastically call “music”. I definitely would have divulged state secrets in the coming 24 hours (If I’d known any),” Lisa Archana Jorgensen wrote.

Regional publication Trønder-Avisa also reported that many students were there to work during the summer recess instead of returning home.

“Thank you for keeping those of us involuntarily staying within the festival area awake in the middle of what is a working week for some,” Ms Archana-Jørgensen continued. “At 3:45 am this morning, I finally found my sorely missed earplugs after searching desperately for them for days.”

Festival organisers confirm neither the student welfare organisation nor the students had been given prior notice of the event.

Director Johan Einar Bjerkem spoke with them, Friday, to arrange hotel rooms for the last few days.

“The hotel offering obviously doesn’t help regarding our lost sleep, but at least it’s a consolation,” one of the affected students said.

Student welfare organisation representatives praise festival organisers for acting so swiftly to resolve the issue.

And as the joke goes: “What’s the difference between an onion and an accordion? Nobody cries when you cut up an accordion.”




Published on Saturday, 19th July, 2014 at 13:27 under the news category, by Sarah Bostock and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 19th July 2014 at 13:37.

This post has the following tags: folkmusic, norway, dancing.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!