Foreign bovines help Norway dairy company and farmers / News / The Foreigner

Foreign bovines help Norway dairy company and farmers. Jersey cows are aiding stave off a repeat of 2011’s national butter shortage fiasco. The animals’ fatter milk means farmers’ cooperative TINE can now produce an extra 1,500 tons of butter. Import duty reductions on the staple foodstuff are also helping. Amongst this year’s poor weather-induced grass harvest, TINE believes the higher quality moos and money measures will not lead to a repeat of what happened at Christmas two years ago.

norwaybutter, buttershortagenorway



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Foreign bovines help Norway dairy company and farmers

Published on Monday, 1st July, 2013 at 09:31 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 2nd July 2013 at 13:40.

Jersey cows are aiding stave off a repeat of 2011’s national butter shortage fiasco.

A Jersey cow
A Jersey cow
Photo: possumgirl2/Flickr


The animals’ fatter milk means farmers’ cooperative TINE can now produce an extra 1,500 tons of butter. Import duty reductions on the staple foodstuff are also helping.

Amongst this year’s poor weather-induced grass harvest, TINE believes the higher quality moos and money measures will not lead to a repeat of what happened at Christmas two years ago.

“Increased milk fat access is helping ensure that we have enough to cover demand, at least for the current year. We reckon we’ll avoid butter supply problems,” the company’s Knut-Frode Lid told agriculture publication Nationen.

Jerseys are also good news for farmers’ income levels, which lie well below the national average. They are beginning to profit from fatter milk with per litre prices increasing.

Per Aadne Skårland in interest organisation Norsk Jersey says demand for this breed is also up, spawning other beneficial effects too.

“More Jersey cows will be an advantage for Norwegian milk production as a whole. Demand for fat-rich dairy products increases, and milk from Jersey cows is much richer in fat and protein,” he explained.

Jersey cows are not known for having a lot of meat on their bones, however, something which the meat industry now fears will lead to an increased beef shortage.




Published on Monday, 1st July, 2013 at 09:31 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 2nd July 2013 at 13:40.

This post has the following tags: norwaybutter, buttershortagenorway.





  
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