Foreigner gets Norway polar bear warning task / News / The Foreigner

Foreigner gets Norway polar bear warning task. A national of Sweden gets the job of keeping watch for polar bears on the island of Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago. Swedes are popular employees in Norway with their service-minded and hard-working approach. They have also saved the country’s 17th May celebrations. In the latest move, the Governor of Svalbard has tasked 46-year-old Andreas Eriksson with keeping watch for the cuddly-looking but lethal hunters in the Hornsund fjord area, south-western Spitsbergen.

svalbard, norwaypolarbears



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Foreigner gets Norway polar bear warning task

Published on Tuesday, 9th July, 2013 at 11:20 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 9th July 2013 at 12:03.

A national of Sweden gets the job of keeping watch for polar bears on the island of Spitsbergen, Svalbard archipelago.

Svalbard polar bear warning sign
Svalbard polar bear warning sign
Photo: Achim Baque/Shutterstock


Swedes are popular employees in Norway with their service-minded and hard-working approach. They have also saved the country’s 17th May celebrations.

In the latest move, the Governor of Svalbard has tasked 46-year-old Andreas Eriksson with keeping watch for the cuddly-looking but lethal hunters in the Hornsund fjord area, south-western Spitsbergen.

The summer job in this popular tourist area involves protecting a group of researchers in their work documenting hunting cabins.

With it comes binoculars, a rifle, and a flare pistol.

Mr Eriksson, who has previous experience in this since becoming a permanent resident on the island in 2006, beat 300 other applicants.

Aftenposten also reports Statistics Norway (SSB) says about 400 of the island’s some 2,000 permanent inhabitants are foreigners.

They are mostly from Thailand, Russia, and Sweden. Some 3,000 polar bears roam in Svalbard.

“It’s certainly a pretty cool job I’ve been given,” Mr Eriksson told Swedish newspaper Svenska Dagbladet.

Previous foreigners who have visited Spitsbergen include British navigator Henry Hudson in 1607, with Jonas Poole (bap. 1566 – 1612), a British explorer, sealer, and whaler arriving in Hornsund in 1610.

Dutch and Danish crews also voyaged to the area in the 17th Century.

Svalbard became recognised as Norwegian sovereign territory following the signing of the Svalbard Treaty in Paris on 9th February 1920.

It was subject to certain stipulations, however, mainly regarding commercial activities.

The archipelago also saw the 1925 King’s Bay mining tragedy. 21 people died following a gas explosion 300 metres below ground.

This lead to then Labour (Ap) Prime Minister Einar Gerhardsen and his entire Cabinet resigning.

A climate monitoring antenna is also located in Svalbard, as well as a global seed vault.




Published on Tuesday, 9th July, 2013 at 11:20 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 9th July 2013 at 12:03.

This post has the following tags: svalbard, norwaypolarbears.





  
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