Germans, Icelanders to challenge Norway fishing sovereignty / News / The Foreigner

Germans, Icelanders to challenge Norway fishing sovereignty. The Norwegian State and an Iceland-owned German fishing company are engaged in a legal battle in Hålogaland Court of Appeal, Tromsø, regarding a dispute over fishing rights. The row follows last September’s incident in which the Norwegian Coast Guard apprehended the German trawler ‘Kiel’ and crew for illegal fishing in the protection zone around Svalbard. Authorities discovered the Deutsche Fischfang-Union vessel had excessive amounts of haddock aboard.

norwayfishing, icelandfishingdispute



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Germans, Icelanders to challenge Norway fishing sovereignty

Published on Thursday, 27th June, 2013 at 07:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 16th January 2015 at 21:02.

The Norwegian State and an Iceland-owned German fishing company are engaged in a legal battle in Hålogaland Court of Appeal, Tromsø, regarding a dispute over fishing rights.

The German trawler 'Kiel'
The German trawler 'Kiel'
Photo: Ra Boe / Wikimedia Commons


The row follows last September’s incident in which the Norwegian Coast Guard apprehended the German trawler ‘Kiel’ and crew for illegal fishing in the protection zone around Svalbard.

Authorities discovered the Deutsche Fischfang-Union vessel had excessive amounts of haddock aboard.

The company was fined NOK 40,000 (some USD 6,570/EUR 5,000/GBP 4,300), and the captain ordered to pay NOK 15,000 (roughly USD 2,500/EUR 1,900/GBP 1,600), Svalbardposten reports.

Plaintiffs Deutsche Fischfang-Union believe that the Spitsbergen Treaty should cover the 200 nautical mile protected zone around the Svalbard group of islands, however. The Icelandic fishing group Samherji owns the German company.

Norway, the US, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, the UK, the British overseas Dominions, and Sweden, among others, signed the Svalbard Treaty concerning Spitsbergen in Paris in 1920. Germany became a signatory in 1925 and Iceland in 1994.

The treaty recognises Norway’s sovereignty over the Arctic Archipelago of Svalbard, but allows the High Contracting parties equal fishing and hunting rights, banning any monopoly. Iceland has long-protested regulation of the fishing zone around Svalbard by Norway.

Defendants in the trial are the Norwegian State. Norway State lawyer Lars Fause discounts the German Icelandic-owned company’s claim regarding the treaty.

“They argue that the Svalbard Treaty is an illusion, Norwegian sovereignty is an illusion, and that Norway should refrain from the right to decide over fishery resources in the fisheries protection zone around Svalbard. Norway does not intend to surrender sovereign rights up in the Barents Sea,” he said.

Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs lawyer Hallvard Østgård thinks Deutsche Fischfang-Union has a good case, though. The Ministry is amongst those observing the case in court.

“The international community was ensured the economic exploitation opportunities up there on equal footing when the Svalbard Treaty came into force. It is believed it also applies to areas within the protection zone, not just the islands. The party who loses here will probably not be happy with the result and appeal [to the Supreme Court],” NRK quoted him as stating.




Published on Thursday, 27th June, 2013 at 07:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 16th January 2015 at 21:02.

This post has the following tags: norwayfishing, icelandfishingdispute.





  
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