Government aids domestic violence victims / News / The Foreigner

Government aids domestic violence victims. A new internet portal is launched to provide information and guidance for victims, their next of kin, those who commit domestic violence, and experts. The website, which is developed and operated by the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), is part of the government’s 2014-17 action plan to tackle so-termed violence in close relations. As well as providing facts on where to find support in different locations, the website allows people to ask questions anonymously.

violence, abuse, rape, victim, domestic, paywall



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Government aids domestic violence victims

Published on Tuesday, 16th February, 2016 at 22:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

A new internet portal is launched to provide information and guidance for victims, their next of kin, those who commit domestic violence, and experts.

Domestic violence
Domestic violence
Photo: Concha García Hernández/W. Commons


The website, which is developed and operated by the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), is part of the government’s 2014-17 action plan to tackle so-termed violence in close relations.

As well as providing facts on where to find support in different locations, the website allows people to ask questions anonymously.

“It’s important that victims get good, qualified help as quickly as possible. Dinutvei.no will make it easier to find help and information about violence and abuse,” says Progress’ (FrP) Minister of Justice Anders Anundsen in a statement.

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines violence as being: “the intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment, or deprivation."

Their 2002 World Report on Violence and Health (WRVH) also presents a typology of violence.

While not uniformly accepted, according to the WHO, this typology distinguishes four modes in which violence may be inflicted: physical, sexual, and psychological attack, and deprivation.

The document also further divides the general definition of violence into three sub-types according to the victim-perpetrator relationship. One of these is classified as interpersonal violence.

Serious injuries         

Norway’s Institute of Science and Technology (NTNU) and Institute for Urban and Regional Research (NIBR) conducted a joint study in 2005 on violence between couples.

Researchers found that some 40 per cent of women in Norway had been subjected to threats or violence after turning 15. Almost half of the men asked answered that this had happened to them.

Over one in four women and one in five men aged 15 and over said that their partner had used physical force against them at least once.

This inquiry also revealed that five per cent of women and men had experienced this in the past 12 months.

Moreover, almost 20 per cent of the women had experienced that someone had tried to force them to have sexual intercourse, while near ten per cent had been forced to have this.

The corresponding figures for men were about 3.4 per cent, and one per cent, respectively. However, barely 60 per cent (4,618) answered the survey, which was sent out to 7,600 randomly-selected people.

In 2009, the Resource Centre for Men (Reform) published a revised edition of their report on male victims of domestic violence. They quote national and regional studies showing that every fourth to sixth person who had “ever experienced” severe partner violence is a man.

Severe partner is violence depicted as violence with major potential for causing physical injury. It is categorised by attempted strangulation, the use of knives or other weapons, using objects to attack the head, or by people having their heads smashed against a wall.

Two per cent of men and eight per cent of women had experienced violence of this nature in their lifetime.

Humiliating

The latest research into violence against children, later victimisation, and mental health has been published by the Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS).

Some of the areas covered are childhood violence, parental physical and psychological violence, parental physical neglect, and adult violence. This category covered forcible rape and physical violence at 18 years old, as well as so-termed intimate partner violence.

The unweighted data shows that some six per cent of women and under 0.5 per cent of men said that they had experienced forcible rape. The respective unweighted percentages for physical violence are just over six and nearly 14.

Approximately nine per cent of women and just fewer than two per cent of men had experienced intimate partner violence. But participation here was also low. Just 2,435 women and 2,092 men aged 18–75 participated, which took 40,000 people randomly-selected from the Norwegian Population Register.

According to Minister of Justice Anders Anundsen, the NKVTS website is one aid victims of domestic violence can use.

“Not everyone knows what kind of help they can get or where to get help. Many survivors may also experience it as difficult to ask for help. Therefore, we have created Dinutvei.no as an important contribution to this process,” he declares.

Taboo

Tove Smaadahl, general manager of The Women’s Shelter (Krisesentersekreteriatet) is critical of the time it has taken to establish the portal. Norway’s first national action plan against domestic violence came out in 2000.

She declares that the website “should have been in place years ago.” The NGO has been running shelters for 38 years and focuses on victims of domestic violence, amongst other areas.

56,536 women, 364 men, and 41,352 stayed at one of Norway’s shelters between 1992 and the end 2014, statistics on their website show. 20,000 people a year contact them.

“The fact that there are so many women and men who suffer from domestic violence shows that gender equality in Norway does not exist. These figures are also the tip of the iceberg,” Ms Smaadahl also tells The Foreigner.

At the same time, she believes that the portal will help many.

“It’s so important for the victims to be able to go to a website where they can find help and information, as domestic violence is a taboo subject with so much shame attached to it,” concludes Ms Smaadahl.

Further reading and resources




Published on Tuesday, 16th February, 2016 at 22:22 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

This post has the following tags: violence, abuse, rape, victim, domestic, paywall.





  
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