Government proposes farmhouse alcohol sales / News / The Foreigner

Government proposes farmhouse alcohol sales. Progress’ (FrP) Agriculture Minister Sylvi Listhaug plans to make it easier for small manufactures to direct sell their products. Included in the proposal are apple cider, pear cider, and other fruit and berry-based fermented drinks. Beer-like beverages based on ingredients other than malt are other types of drink under consideration.

alcohol, norway, laws



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Government proposes farmhouse alcohol sales

Published on Sunday, 18th January, 2015 at 10:00 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Progress’ (FrP) Agriculture Minister Sylvi Listhaug plans to make it easier for small manufactures to direct sell their products.

17th-century log farmhouse
This picture shows part of the Søre Harildstad farm in Gudbrandsdalen valley's Heidal, Oppland County. The owners of this Grade I listed building applied for a limited alcohol serving licence a few years ago. It was approved.17th-century log farmhouse
Photo: Øyvind S. Johansen/Wikimedia Commons


Included in the proposal are apple cider, pear cider, and other fruit and berry-based fermented drinks.

Beer-like beverages based on ingredients other than malt are other types of drink under consideration.

The move, if approved, would exploit a presumed loophole not covered by the EEA Agreement.

Sales of these drinks containing over 4.7 per cent alcohol - currently only allowed through government alcohol chain Vinmonopolet - would thus be allowed.

Minister Listhaug underlines that the farmhouse niche product manufacturer proposal would neither change nor weaken the current monopoly arrangement, and is of limited scope.

According to her, exploiting the possible non-EEA Agreement loophole would probably “not lead to increased alcohol consumption”. This is because the niche sales arrangement “will only include a few product groups.”

Norway’s Rightist government has introduced a variety of ‘man-in-the-street’-friendly measures and proposals.

Some of these are tax cuts and legalising poker games with pots of up to 10,000 Norwegian kroner (maximum 1,000 per player with up to 10 players).

Raising the import duty and sales tax exemption limit from 200 to 350 kroner (though this now includes postage and packaging), as well and scrapping import duties on certain items are others.

At the same time, not all of the National Budget 2015 proposals have enamoured the bipartite coalition’s supporters.

Proposed Sunday opening has also riled some shopkeepers and unions.



Published on Sunday, 18th January, 2015 at 10:00 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: alcohol, norway, laws.





  
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