Government scraps labour migrant scheme / News / The Foreigner

Government scraps labour migrant scheme. UPDATED: Norwegian officials stop granting one-year residence permits to skilled foreign workers amongst illegality fears, reports say. The original programme was designed for skilled foreign labour such as IT experts or engineers wishing to learn Norwegian and apply for a job afterwards. Officials granted a temporary residence permit for up to a year. Applicants also had to prove they had 100,000 Norwegian kroner (about 16,300 US dollars/12,000 euros/9,600 pounds sterling) at today’s ROE) in their bank account. This was to be used to support themselves financially during this time.

norway, work, employment, jobs, immigration



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News Article

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Government scraps labour migrant scheme

Published on Thursday, 26th June, 2014 at 12:23 under the news category, by Sarah Winkelmann and Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 26th June 2014 at 16:38.

UPDATED: Norwegian officials stop granting one-year residence permits to skilled foreign workers amongst illegality fears, reports say.

Desk
Skilled foreign workers wishing to work in Norway now have fewer residency permit schemes to apply under.Desk
Photo: Jordan Fischer/Wikimedia Commons


The original programme was designed for skilled foreign labour such as IT experts or engineers wishing to learn Norwegian and apply for a job afterwards. Officials granted a temporary residence permit for up to a year.

Applicants also had to prove they had 100,000 Norwegian kroner (about 16,300 US dollars/12,000 euros/9,600 pounds sterling) at today’s ROE) in their bank account. This was to be used to support themselves financially during this time.

However, the UDI’s (Norwegian Directorate of Immigration) told NRK Hanna Krange told NRK that “the same amount which was to document temporary residence for one applicant was taken out of their account after this was granted and deposited into the next applicant’s account.”

The UDI says general misuse of the scheme was the resulting reason for its withdrawal.

“The Ministry of Justice and Public Security has decided to change the rules because only a few of those who applied for this type of residence permit subsequently got a skilled job in Norway. The scheme was also abused by people who had plans to learn Norwegian in order to work in Norway,” UDI officials write on their website.

Some 2,800 foreign workers with expertise had obtained residence under the scheme from its introduction up until April 2014.  151 applied for a job in 2012, 37 the year before, NRK reported.

He alludes to other programmes available for skilled foreign workers.

The UDI has two schemes. One is a registration scheme designed for EU/EEA nationals, the other for skilled workers.  

Expert immigration lawyer Arild Humlen thinks that the government should have rather tightened the rules than removing the entire programme.

“Conducting specific legislation regulation is quite simple. One can , for example, require money to be deposited into escrow accounts instead of sending bank statements to the UDI,” he said.



Published on Thursday, 26th June, 2014 at 12:23 under the news category, by Sarah Winkelmann and Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 26th June 2014 at 16:38.

This post has the following tags: norway, work, employment, jobs, immigration.





  
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