Greenpeace protest Statoil Arctic campaign / News / The Foreigner

Greenpeace protest Statoil Arctic campaign. STAVANGER: Environmentalists are in the Barents Sea trying to shield Bear Island from possible harmful effects of the Norwegian energy giant’s drilling campaign. As shareholders, Greenpeace have also submitted two motions to the Statoil board. These are due to be considered under today’s AGM in Stavanger. One of these asks the company to follow Norwegian standards abroad and not drill in any Arctic state’s icy waters, therefore.

statoil, arctic, oil, drilling



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Greenpeace protest Statoil Arctic campaign

Published on Wednesday, 14th May, 2014 at 13:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 14th May 2014 at 22:32.

STAVANGER: Environmentalists are in the Barents Sea trying to shield Bear Island from possible harmful effects of the Norwegian energy giant’s drilling campaign.

A Greenpeace boat
Two Greenpeace craft aoard the 'Esperanza' in Stavanger.A Greenpeace boat
Photo: ©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


As shareholders, Greenpeace have also submitted two motions to the Statoil board. These are due to be considered under today’s AGM in Stavanger.

One of these asks the company to follow Norwegian standards abroad and not drill in any Arctic state’s icy waters, therefore.

Oil drilling near the ice edge zone where sea ice and the open ocean meet is not allowed under the bi-partite Centre-Right coalition government’s cooperation agreement with the Christian Democrats (KrF) and Liberals (V). This is because of lacking technology and expertise for oil spill clean-up.

Greenpeace’s second motion, in cooperation with WWF (World Wide Fund for Nature), proposes that Statoil withdraw from the tar sands project in Alberta, Canada.

The Foreigner met with Greenpeace Nordic press spokesperson Åshild Lappegård Lahn aboard their ship the ‘Esperanza’ before they departed from Stavanger Harbour on this week’s voyage northwards, Monday.

“Statoil is the only company with licences in all Arctic jurisdictions, and there shouldn’t be any drilling in icy waters,” she said.

67 per cent state-owned Statoil applied for permission this year to drill an exploration well about 117 miles south-east of Bear Island on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

Exploration well 7325/1-1 is part of the company’s Atlantis prospect. Atlantis and other prospect Apollo fall under PL 615. Both are The 'Esperanza' in Stavanger Harbour
The 'Esperanza' in Stavanger Harbour
©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner
located in the Hoop area.

The Norwegian Environmental Agency granted Statoil conditional permission to drill the Apollo exploration well on 06th May this year. They will be making a decision regarding Atlantis by the end of this month.  

Hoop is not far from the Bear Island Arctic nature reserve. According to Greenpeace, it has one of the largest bird colonies in the Northern Hemisphere and is home to Arctic polar bears and foxes in the winter.

Other species found around Bear Island are white-beaked dolphins, minke whales, walruses, as well as ringed, harp, hooded, and harbour seals.

Greenpeace say they are concerned about the effects of an oil spill in a region with a fragile ecosystem that is extremely vulnerable to this type of incident.

There are also weather, temperature, ice, dark winter light conditions, and huge distances to consider.

The Hoop field is not in open water. At the same time, Erlend Tellnes, Arctic Campaigner at Greenpeace Nordic is concerned that Statoil is planning to drill for oil so close to Bear Island.

“[This is] especially as Statoil’s own oil spill modelling shows a spill could reach the bird cliffs on Bear Island in less than a week,” he said.

Åshild Lappegård Lahn explained Greenpeace aim to “protect Bear Island from oil spills.”

“The Hoop area is very close to the ice edge at its maximum extent. We remember what happened when the Godafoss ship ran aground. It wasn’t a large oil spill, but the effects were substantial.”

Nordic and international authorities subsequently conducted a major simulation exercise in the Oslo Fjord to test readiness in case of a shipping disaster.




Published on Wednesday, 14th May, 2014 at 13:11 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 14th May 2014 at 22:32.

This post has the following tags: statoil, arctic, oil, drilling.





  
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