Hackers get Norway info secrets / News / The Foreigner

Hackers get Norway info secrets. Norwegian security officials report the theft of sensitive information from key defence, oil, and energy companies. National Security Authority (NSM) personnel say, “the way the virus has been programmed and data has been extracted from network traffic suggest there is a high probability the same actor is behind the attacks.” In several cases, the attacks, one of which was discovered just this month, are linked to several major contract negotiations. They are believed to be the most comprehensive ever reported in Norway.

norwayhacking, hackerattacksnorwaydefenceindustry



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Hackers get Norway info secrets

Published on Wednesday, 16th November, 2011 at 11:26 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 16th November 2011 at 12:09.

Norwegian security officials report the theft of sensitive information from key defence, oil, and energy companies.

Dedicated servers
Dedicated servers
Photo: Michal Maros/Wikimedia Commons


National Security Authority (NSM) personnel say, “the way the virus has been programmed and data has been extracted from network traffic suggest there is a high probability the same actor is behind the attacks.”

In several cases, the attacks, one of which was discovered just this month, are linked to several major contract negotiations. They are believed to be the most comprehensive ever reported in Norway.

“Tailor-made emails containing viruses are sent to steal all the information on computers belonging to selected individuals within large Norwegian companies. This could be industrial plans, usernames, and passwords, for example,” officials state.

The viruses are designed to avoid detection by anti-virus programmes, with varying kinds of attacks. Businesses usually do not discover they have been hacked until afterwards, “making it likely that industrial secrets have been stolen and sent out of the country digitally.”

According to the US Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive (ONCIX), hackers can gather huge amounts of digitally-stored information quickly, and with little risk.

In their latest report, officials argue, “Chinese actors are the world’s most active and persistent perpetrators of economic espionage.” They also point the finger at Russian intelligence services, and allege, “Some US allies and partners use their broad access to US institutions to acquire sensitive US economic and technology information, primarily through aggressive elicitation and other human intelligence (HUMINT) tactics. Some of these states have advanced cyber capabilities.”

The US also claims it was most likely Chinese military sources were behind attempts to hack into America’s satellites via SvalSat, the Svalbard Satellite Service, with its allegedly outdated software. China denies this. The Nobel Institute was also hacked following last year’s Peace Prize Award to dissident Liu Xiaobo.

NSM press spokesperson Kjetil Berg Veire tells The Foreigner, “Hacking has become an increasing problem in recent years in all sectors, with a growing number of targeted computer attacks becoming more sophisticated.”

“There are many different types of attacks. The most common is that a key leader or person gets an email containing an attachment that looks normal. Even the attachment itself may not seem suspicious, as it may refer to something they are currently working on. However, the virus or Trojan horse contained in it can do almost anything to the computer once opened.”

Saying people should be aware of this when sending or receiving emails, not blindly click on attachments or links, he advises key personnel “to assess the type of information contained in the emails.”

Aftenposten reports NorCERT’s (Norwegian Computer Emergency Response Team) head of section Eiliv Ofigsbø warns the recent attacks on the Norwegian businesses are “an operation that has been going on for some time and is still continuing.”

Both the NSM and Police Security Service (PST) are now investigating the matter, and regard it as “extremely serious.”




Published on Wednesday, 16th November, 2011 at 11:26 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 16th November 2011 at 12:09.

This post has the following tags: norwayhacking, hackerattacksnorwaydefenceindustry.





  
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