Halloween a type of terrorism, says Norwegian / News / The Foreigner

Halloween a type of terrorism, says Norwegian. STAVANGER: That ghoulish time of year is here again. Norwegians have a love-hate relationship with the festival. Translated into moods of Norwegian-ness, their feelings towards Halloween are slightly enthusiastic-matter-of-fact in a lightly dismissive manner. The Foreigner spoke to seven random Norwegians in the western Norway city of Stavanger, Thursday, to find out what they thought.

halloween, pumpkins, stavanger, norway, us



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Halloween a type of terrorism, says Norwegian

Published on Thursday, 30th October, 2014 at 18:20 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

STAVANGER: That ghoulish time of year is here again. Norwegians have a love-hate relationship with the festival.

A pumpkin
'Henry' the pumpkin is popular in Norway, but for other reasons than Halloween.A pumpkin
Photo: ©2014 Michael Sandelson/The Foreigner


Translated into moods of Norwegian-ness, their feelings towards Halloween are slightly enthusiastic-matter-of-fact in a lightly dismissive manner.

The Foreigner spoke to seven random Norwegians in the western Norway city of Stavanger, Thursday, to find out what they thought.

“My young son thinks it’s great,” said a 35-year-old trendily-dressed man with a wood-like skateboard and red headphones outside clothing shop Hennes and Mauritz opposite the Cathedral.

The 12th Century building is made of stone, the complete opposite to his facial expression when describing how much his son finds Halloween.

But joy in the interviewees in Stavanger regarding the celebration was otherwise limited that day.

“We don’t go trick or treating, because it’s considered socially unacceptable for people of our age,” said one teenager to The Foreigner.

Do you have any friends in America who like celebrating Halloween?

“No,” the two others replied.                                    

Two other people in their 20s said they did not celebrate Halloween.

The weather was mildly sunny, the temperature mildly wintery.  

‘Henry’ the pumpkin, as the final interviewee called the pre-bought cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, a cultivar of the squash plant) sitting beside me on the bench was mildly orange in colour.

Prior to the interviews, the fruit and vegetable seller had explained that most people buy them to make soup.

“Halloween does not belong in Norway at all, but in Ireland,” a 60-year-old grandmother-of-three declared. “We do celebrate Sankthans (Midsummer/St. John’s Day) here, but Halloween irritates me.”

“Everyone has to sit in the dark with the lights off thinking about ghosts and witches, not to mention putting on fake blood.”

According to her, parents are to blame for their children celebrating the occasion.

Have you ever had eggs thrown at your house if you didn’t give callers any sweets?

“Not in this connection. But Halloween is a form of terrorism,” she concluded.



Published on Thursday, 30th October, 2014 at 18:20 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: halloween, pumpkins, stavanger, norway, us.





  
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