Hard to get jobs with foreign name / News / The Foreigner

Hard to get jobs with foreign name. People with foreign names are less likely to get work compared to those with Norwegian ones, researchers state. Fafo and the Institute of Social Research (ISF) scientists sent out 1,800 fake replies to job advertisements as a litmus test. Results showed that those with foreign names only had 25% chance of getting a job interview, even if they had the same qualifications as their Norwegian counterparts.

norwayjobs, foreignworkersnorway, norwayforeigndiscrimination



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Hard to get jobs with foreign name

Published on Thursday, 12th January, 2012 at 09:31 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

People with foreign names are less likely to get work compared to those with Norwegian ones, researchers state.

Audun Lysbakken (R) with Jon Rogstad
'Discrimination against job seekers with a different ethnic background is out,' says Minister Lysbakken.Audun Lysbakken (R) with Jon Rogstad
Photo: Ministry of Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion


Fafo and the Institute of Social Research (ISF) scientists sent out 1,800 fake replies to job advertisements as a litmus test.

Results showed that those with foreign names only had 25% chance of getting a job interview, even if they had the same qualifications as their Norwegian counterparts.

The researchers also interviewed 42 Norwegian employers, finding that many seemed enthusiastic about a multicultural society, but still did not call foreigners to interview.

Whilst denying their results show that working life in Norway is subject to racism, researcher Jon Rogstad told NRK, “but there is clear discrimination between “we” and “they”, where many employers seem to think that “we” are more adaptable.”

“Everyone shall have equal job opportunities, regardless of their ethnic background. The Norwegian labor market needs competent people. Employers who want good results must recruit the best applicants,” said Minister of Children, Equality, and Social Inclusion Audun Lysbakken in a press statement.

Civil servants have recently sent the ministry’s latest SOPEMI report about International Migration to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

The full document can be read here (external link).




Published on Thursday, 12th January, 2012 at 09:31 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: norwayjobs, foreignworkersnorway, norwayforeigndiscrimination.





  
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