Home abortions could become more common / News / The Foreigner

Home abortions could become more common. “Will it be abortion pills at the chemist next?” asks Christian Democratic politician. The government wants to allow non-hospital private gynaecologists to dispense abortion pills. Money has been set aside in the Budget to run a two-year pilot project in Stavanger and on Østlandet. Medical abortion is available at most Norwegian hospitals today, and women generally travel home after collecting pills.

abortion, pills, medical, hospital, laila, daavoey, christian, democratic, party, government, budget, gynaecologist



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News Article

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Home abortions could become more common

Published on Tuesday, 12th October, 2010 at 13:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

“Will it be abortion pills at the chemist next?” asks Christian Democratic politician.

A hospital sign
A hospital sign
Photo: Copyright Dimitrios Kaisaris


The government wants to allow non-hospital private gynaecologists to dispense abortion pills. Money has been set aside in the Budget to run a two-year pilot project in Stavanger and on Østlandet.

Medical abortion is available at most Norwegian hospitals today, and women generally travel home after collecting pills.

KrF (Christian Democratic Party) politician Laila Dåvøy MP is concerned the government’s proposal will only diminish the ethical aspect surrounding abortion even further.

“What will be next, abortion pills at the chemist? I have been and am still worried by the scheme,” she tells Aftenposten.

However, Haukeland University Hospital’s Chief Physician Ole-Erik Iversen, who has been conducting medical abortions for 12 years, welcomes the move.

“Today’s method does not require admission to hospital and the proposal includes a clear stipulation that gynaecologists must cooperate closely with the hospital in case of medical complications,” he says.

According to the hospital, many women who have undergone medical abortions at home were positive when asked about their experience.

“Most felt safe and well at home. Many chose to have an abortion at the weekend, as they do not have to be away from work. [However,] we discourage women to be alone at home,” says a hospital spokesperson.



Published on Tuesday, 12th October, 2010 at 13:36 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: abortion, pills, medical, hospital, laila, daavoey, christian, democratic, party, government, budget, gynaecologist.





  
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