Infrastructure and transport in decay / News / The Foreigner

Infrastructure and transport in decay. Engineers estimate huge repair bill. Norway’s public services are rotting away because of shoddy maintenance routines. In a new report, the Association of Consulting Engineers (RIF) has predicted 800 billion kroner is needed to fix them.No horse and no water “We’ve examined constructions worth 4,000 billion from top to toe, and have concluded there is a massive backlog in eight out of eleven areas crucial to society. The situation is serious because it’s down to years of neglect of the community’s main arteries,” Liv Kari Skudal Hansteen, the association’s Managing Director tells Dagens Næringsliv.

infrastructure, decay, rotting, public, services, spending, water, drains, railways, norway, sweden, denmark



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Infrastructure and transport in decay

Published on Wednesday, 10th March, 2010 at 14:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Engineers estimate huge repair bill.

Rusty broken drain (Illustration photo)
Rusty broken drain (Illustration photo)
Photo: zimpenfish/Flickr


Norway’s public services are rotting away because of shoddy maintenance routines. In a new report, the Association of Consulting Engineers (RIF) has predicted 800 billion kroner is needed to fix them.

No horse and no water

“We’ve examined constructions worth 4,000 billion from top to toe, and have concluded there is a massive backlog in eight out of eleven areas crucial to society. The situation is serious because it’s down to years of neglect of the community’s main arteries,” Liv Kari Skudal Hansteen, the association’s Managing Director tells Dagens Næringsliv.

Rotting wooden sewers and rusty pump house pipes have been found in Bærum municipality, and the operation of the entire Norwegian sewerage network is at risk because of its appalling standard. The association believes the bill for putting this back in order will be in the region of 110 billion alone.

The drinking water supply is also in a state of disrepair, losing a third of its contents due to leaks in the water pipes. Tom Baade-Mathiesen in the consultancy firm Norconsult estimates it’ll take 50 years to restore at the current renewal pace.

Off the rails

The state of the rail network has attracted censure as well, with questions being raised as to its ability to operate.

Denmark has invested twice as much per head as Norway in the last 15 years, with Sweden having spent five times more on stations, signals, and tracks

Liv Kari Skuldal Hansen believes the government should do more.

“We’re still one of the European countries that spends the least on its railways, and we’re far behind,” she says.



Published on Wednesday, 10th March, 2010 at 14:53 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: infrastructure, decay, rotting, public, services, spending, water, drains, railways, norway, sweden, denmark.





  
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