International Workers Day / News / The Foreigner

International Workers Day. Unemployment, wage differences, and lambasting Labour’s welfare state. For the Labour Party (Ap), International Workers Day (Arbeidernes Dag) was about unemployment. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg visited Lillehammer and Hamar, holding what was a traditional 01 May speech about jobs for all. “There are more than 30,000 fewer unemployed than we estimated there would be. This shows our preventative measures have worked,” he said.

jens, stoltenberg, labour, ap, international, workers, day, silje, schei, tveitdal, sv, socialist, left, siv, jensen, progress, party, frp



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International Workers Day

Published on Sunday, 2nd May, 2010 at 20:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 2nd May 2010 at 22:09.

Unemployment, wage differences, and lambasting Labour’s welfare state.

Jens Stoltenberg's 1 May speech
Jens Stoltenberg's 1 May speech
Photo: Arbeiderpartiet/Flickr


Success

For the Labour Party (Ap), International Workers Day (Arbeidernes Dag) was about unemployment. Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg visited Lillehammer and Hamar, holding what was a traditional 01 May speech about jobs for all.

“There are more than 30,000 fewer unemployed than we estimated there would be. This shows our preventative measures have worked,” he said.

Stoltenberg’s government introduced these measures in the wake of the international financial crisis.

The Party will shortly be presenting a revised national budget, showing a decrease in the estimated unemployment rate to 3 ½ percent.

Stoltenberg went on to say the figures are both clearly below average for the past 20 years, and are well under standard levels in an international context. He claimed Norway has the lowest unemployment rate in Europe.

But despite the promising news, the Prime Minister also talked about the continuing fight against appalling pay levels and dangerous working conditions, especially in the hotel and restaurant branches. 

“Despite considerable efforts by the government and trade unions, there are still too many examples of lousy pay, dangerous workplaces, and unworthy living conditions. We must, therefore, further strengthen the fight against social dumping. We must avoid a dual labour market in Norway, for the sake of employees, legitimate businesses, and society,” said Stoltenberg.

The government will be enforcing a new regulation from 01 January next year, which it says will be determined in the near future.

Dignity

Pay was also one of the Socialist Left’s (SV) themes, focusing on discrimination between the sexes. Women earn approximately 85 percent in relation to men, with little improvement since 1985.

“Wage differences between women and men are one of the greatest injustices in society.  SV says women must get the wage they deserve. The party supports their demand to be paid equally for the same type of work. We must also make political resolutions that contribute towards evening these out,” said the Party’s Secretary, Silje Schei Tveitdal, in her speeches in Lillesand and Birkenes.

Schei Tveitdal also talked about the immense challenge of climate change. She used the opportunity to mention their political differences with Labour over the issue of drilling for oil off Lofoten, Vesterålen, and Senja.

 “We need an industrial policy that creates work for everyone without us pumping up all the oil and gas deposits The case is about more than vulnerable oceans and climate. It’s the litmus test for whether we will pursue an alternative to the oil economy.”

Waffles and welfare

The Far-Right, represented by an apparently hungry Siv Jensen, leader of the Progress Party (FrP), spoke to between 200 and 300 gathered in Bragernes Square in Drammen.

Prior to beginning her speech Ms. Jensen took a bite out of a waffle, before taking a bite out of what the Party claims to be Labour’s non-version of the welfare state.

“The fact that you can go to work each day is because some entrepreneurs have created jobs. We want to create the welfare state,” said Jensen.

Aftenposten writes kicking Labour about the welfare state is nothing new. Jensen had competition from football supporters who’d come to see Vålrenga (VIF) play away against Strømsgodset.

According to Drammens Tidende, each group stood outside their respective pubs, shouting and singing.

In the middle of Jensen’s speech, unrelated to what she was saying, there was clapping.

“Every time I'm on Facebook and mention that I’m a Vålerenga fan, there are a lot of comments. So today, I think it’s appropriate to wish both teams good luck and a fun match,” Aftenposten reports her as saying.

Jensen went on to speak at a women’s spa and beauty weekend at the Quality Spa and Resort Norefjell Hotel, partaking in another brand of welfare.

“We’ve stocked up with a lot of extra white wine and pink champagne, so everything is ready for a nice weekend, says hotel director Tom Myrseth.




Published on Sunday, 2nd May, 2010 at 20:12 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 2nd May 2010 at 22:09.

This post has the following tags: jens, stoltenberg, labour, ap, international, workers, day, silje, schei, tveitdal, sv, socialist, left, siv, jensen, progress, party, frp.





  
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