Kindergarten children experience excessive stress / News / The Foreigner

Kindergarten children experience excessive stress. Full-time kindergarten education is too stressful for young children, according to a new study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). The report shows that children under the age of two have recorded high levels of Cortisol, a stress indicator hormone in their bodies. “It is extremely difficult by definition for a child to be in kindergarten a full day. What are particularly distressing for them is high tempo, noise levels, large groups, and not being comforted in the way they need,” Associate Professor May Drugli at the Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (RBUP), Midt-Norge, tells Adresseavisen.

stressfulkindergartens, norwegianuniversityofscienceandtechnology



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Kindergarten children experience excessive stress

Published on Tuesday, 5th July, 2011 at 14:35 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last Updated on 5th July 2011 at 23:50.

Full-time kindergarten education is too stressful for young children, according to a new study from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Revelheia kindergarten (illus. photo)
Revelheia kindergarten (illus. photo)
Photo: Sandivas/Wikimedia Commons


The report shows that children under the age of two have recorded high levels of Cortisol, a stress indicator hormone in their bodies.

“It is extremely difficult by definition for a child to be in kindergarten a full day. What are particularly distressing for them is high tempo, noise levels, large groups, and not being comforted in the way they need,” Associate Professor May Drugli at the Regional Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (RBUP), Midt-Norge, tells Adresseavisen.

41 parents and 35 kindergarten personnel in Trondheim took part in the study. Half of the parents said that their children felt tired after a full day in kindergarten. Two-thirds of nursery staff went on to confirm that the children often leave “very tired”. Nearly 80% of one and two-year-olds currently attend kindergarten.

Whilst children of three are more able to cope because they “can express their needs through language”, she says one-year-olds are “dependent on an adult who interprets and understands them. The smallest ones need the sensitivity of adults in a completely different way.”

Ms Drugli believes kindergartens have pushed the youngest to the back of the queue, rather than blaming the parents for putting their children there in the first place.

“It’s not that important for the smallest ones they have a climbing wall or a wall-mounted alphabet, but sensitive adults that lie on the floor with them and point and talk,” she says.

Editor's note: Whilst the term "kindergarten" more often applies to children in schools from three years old in English-speaking countries, Norway only has one term, 'Barnehage' (Kindergarten) for children's schools before the age of six.




Published on Tuesday, 5th July, 2011 at 14:35 under the news category, by John Price   .
Last updated on 5th July 2011 at 23:50.

This post has the following tags: stressfulkindergartens, norwegianuniversityofscienceandtechnology.





  
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