Long-awaited climate white paper publicised / News / The Foreigner

Long-awaited climate white paper publicised. VIDEO: The government presented what it terms is an ‘offensive’ climate white paper, Wednesday, warning it will take measures to cut Norway’s emissions and make it a low emissions society by the middle of the 21st Century. “We’re presenting a proactive climate policy. We will strengthen measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions both internationally and in Norway. We are among the countries of the world with the most ambitious goals for climate policy. Now we will intensify our efforts,” Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg declared. The main goals are to contribute to a global climate agreement in keeping with the two-degree target discussed at 2009’s COP15 summit in Copenhagen.

norwayclimatewhitepaper, globalemissionscuts, greenhousegasemissions



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Long-awaited climate white paper publicised

Published on Wednesday, 25th April, 2012 at 21:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Geetika Nautiyal   .
Last Updated on 25th April 2012 at 22:06.

VIDEO: The government presented what it terms is an ‘offensive’ climate white paper, Wednesday, warning it will take measures to cut Norway’s emissions and make it a low emissions society by the middle of the 21st Century.

Climate white paper presentation
L-R: Socialist Left and Centre Party leaders Audun Lysbakken and Liv Signe Navarsete, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg, Environment Minister Bård Vegar SolhjellClimate white paper presentation
Photo: Norwegian Environment Ministry


“We’re presenting a proactive climate policy. We will strengthen measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions both internationally and in Norway. We are among the countries of the world with the most ambitious goals for climate policy. Now we will intensify our efforts,” Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg declared.

The main goals are to contribute to a global climate agreement in keeping with the two-degree target discussed at 2009’s COP15 summit in Copenhagen.

Regarding the petroleum sector, the government has ambitions of increased use of land-based power on oilrigs, increase CO2 taxes to NOK 200 per ton, and a strategy for rig electrification.

Building regulations are to be tightened, making energy usage in houses passive by 2015, and almost zero five years later. 

Household oil-fired boilers are to be gradually phased out towards 2020 by offering incentives towards switching to more environmentally friendly energy consumption. Installing fossil fuel-fired oil-fired boilers in existing building will be prohibited. 

Grants to public transport and rail building will be increased, with a progress plan for when construction of intercity trains in central areas of eastern Norway could be completed. Funding combined cycle/walkways will be doubled by 2017.

On the roads, new car emissions should be less than 85 grams of CO2/km, with access to parking with charging stations for plug-in hybrid vehicles.

Despite an earlier governmental U-turn on biodiesel tax, politicians want to increase its addition in ordinary diesel to five percent “when there are good sustainability criteria”, and 10 when more experience with these has been gained.

There is to be more tree planting, forests are to be preserved, with waste to be used for bio-energy. The government will also contribute to developing biogas from livestock manure and household/industrial waste.

A new fund for climate, energy, and using alternative energy forms has also been established, aimed at contributing to develop technology that will reduce emissions. NOK 5 billion extra kroner will be allocated in 2013 to give capital of NOK 30 billion. This will gradually be increased to NOK 50 billion in 2020. 

In addition to becoming a low-emissions society, Norway would like to see a 50-85 percent reduction in global emissions compared with 2000 levels, and aims to cut its domestic ones by two-thirds by the year 2020.

“We will conduct a long-term, future-oriented restructuring of Norway into a society with low greenhouse gas emissions. It will be easier for people to take climate-friendly choices in their daily lives, and the industry will support the necessary technology. Such a change also means that we must be prepared to implement national climate measures that are more expensive than measures in other countries,” announced Environment Minister Bård Vegar Solhjell.

Watch The Foreigner’s video interview with environmental organisation Bellona's Janne Stene below ©2012 Geetika Nautiyal/The Foreigner


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Published on Wednesday, 25th April, 2012 at 21:13 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Geetika Nautiyal   .
Last updated on 25th April 2012 at 22:06.

This post has the following tags: norwayclimatewhitepaper, globalemissionscuts, greenhousegasemissions.


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