More foreigners may breed Norway election insecurity / News / The Foreigner

More foreigners may breed Norway election insecurity. UPDATED: Next year’s general election could see a shift of government even if foreigners living in Norway are not allowed to vote. Whilst being a Norwegian citizen is mandatory in order to cast ballots, the Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development traditionally allocates the country’s counties mandates based on their numbers of inhabitants. High levels of immigration are set to give rightist counties such as Oslo, Akershus, and Rogaland a higher concentration of foreigners.

norwaygeneralelections, immigrationnorway



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More foreigners may breed Norway election insecurity

Published on Friday, 23rd March, 2012 at 13:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 23rd March 2012 at 20:13.

UPDATED: Next year’s general election could see a shift of government even if foreigners living in Norway are not allowed to vote.

Interior of the Norwegian Parliament
Interior of the Norwegian Parliament
Photo: Tomoyoshi/Wikimedia Commons


Whilst being a Norwegian citizen is mandatory in order to cast ballots, the Ministry of Local Government and Regional Development traditionally allocates the country’s counties mandates based on their numbers of inhabitants.

High levels of immigration are set to give rightist counties such as Oslo, Akershus, and Rogaland a higher concentration of foreigners.

Recent figures from Statistics Norway (SSB) show non-Norwegian passport-holders account for 14.2, 9.7, and 9.3 percent of inhabitants in these counties, respectively.

Researcher Bernt Aardal predicts this will impact 2013’s political parliamentary make-up by giving Oslo two new mandates, with Akershus, Rogaland, and Hordaland gaining one each.

In turn, this will cost the Red-Green tri-partite coalition its majority in Parliament, with Labour alone losing two MPs, reports Klassekampen.

Perhaps somewhat paradoxically, whilst the proposal improves Progress’ (FrP) position, Anders Anundsen, the Party’s head of Parliament’s Standing Committee on Scrutiny and Constitutional Affairs, wants to change this.

“We have just started working on this question internally within the Party. I believe the number of Norwegian citizens, rather than inhabitants, should form the basis in the future.”

Other Opposition Parties the Conservatives (H) and Christian Democrats (KrF) tell The Foreigner they have not discussed the matter yet.



Published on Friday, 23rd March, 2012 at 13:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 23rd March 2012 at 20:13.

This post has the following tags: norwaygeneralelections, immigrationnorway.





  
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