Neda’s deportation not a coincidence says lawyer / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Neda’s deportation not a coincidence says lawyer. The Ibrahim family’s lawyer Arild Humlen thinks the Norwegian State deliberately acted hastily to avoid potential problems. This week’s widespread condemnation of the deportation began after Western Norway police broke into the family’s residence at Sandnes municipality’s Dale asylum seeker reception centre in the early hours of Tuesday morning. Police have since informed regional publication Aftenbladet they first rang the doorbell and knocked on the windows, but nobody appeared to be at home.

norwaydeportations, asylumseekersnorway



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Neda’s deportation not a coincidence says lawyer

Published on Wednesday, 12th June, 2013 at 20:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Shruti Chauhan   .
Last Updated on 12th June 2013 at 20:25.

The Ibrahim family’s lawyer Arild Humlen thinks the Norwegian State deliberately acted hastily to avoid potential problems.



This week’s widespread condemnation of the deportation began after Western Norway police broke into the family’s residence at Sandnes municipality’s Dale asylum seeker reception centre in the early hours of Tuesday morning.

Police have since informed regional publication Aftenbladet they first rang the doorbell and knocked on the windows, but nobody appeared to be at home.

Talking of the glass door pane that was broken at the time, Rogaland police district foreigners’ section head Jarle Søyland said this happened “when officers banged on the door. Then they removed a plank which was blocking it and unlocked it. This door was in very poor condition. The officer knocked against it twice with his shoulder.”

“They came with torches, telling us we had to get dressed,” Neda told the paper by phone.

The family consisting of 12-year-old Neda, parents Said and Romah, 10-year-old Nael, Dima, 8, and 4-year-old Zoher was then driven to Stavanger Sola airport and immigration officers put them on a plane to Amman in Jordan via Copenhagen and Rome.

Police’s reason for the deportation was judging Mr and Mrs Ibrahim had provided incorrect information when seeking asylum.

The Immigration Appeals Board (UNE) had turned down the Ibrahims’ asylum application last year after their 10-year residence in Norway.

Immigration officers allege the family had said they were Palestinians from Iraq, whilst immigration authorities maintain they are Palestinians from the West Bank or Jordan.

The family’s a lawyer Arild Humlen has filed a lawsuit against the Norwegian state for a judicial review of the UNE’s decision. The case has not gone to trial yet, however.

“The suit comes after a decision in April this year not to change the original one regarding the deportation”, Mr Humlen told The Foreigner, and that “it’s based in Article 8 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, which protects children who have stayed long-term in the county,” he said to The Foreigner earlier today.

“It has also been decided that the Convention will overrule national immigration law at some stage. Immigration authorities have interfered in peoples’ private life here, covered under the Article, and I don’t think authorities have conducted a thorough investigation of the consequences for the children in this matter,” explained Mr Humlen.

He stated Neda’s case is problematic, and finds the deportation “strange”.

“I asked for a temporary deportation injunction from the Court against the state. Yesterday was the last day of remarks in the matter, and the Court is due to look into it today and tomorrow,” he elaborated.

Many Norwegians have expressed outrage at Neda and her family’s deportation. Moreover, whilst a local Rogaland county support group has collected NOK 75,000 (some USD 13,000/EUR 9,800/GBP 8,300) to pay for the case’s legal fees, the Socialist Left’s (SV) Tromsø branch has demanded Minister of Justice and Public Security Grete Faremo’s resign.

In a press release, they said this is because they felt she is “unable to get subordinate bodies to act in accordance with the laws, political decisions, and common decency. Norway is not served by having such a Minister.”

Last year, the government published its long-awaited whitepaper regarding asylum seeker children, including those who have lived in Norway for a long period. It states that the child’s best interests should be considered, but contains no legislation changes.

“We must ensure the protection of the children who need it, while we pursue a policy that does not encourage anyone to embark on a journey to Europe with the risk it entails,” Minister Faremo said. “Children who come to Norway alone are particularly vulnerable. It is an important task for the Norwegian authorities to provide good care and legal protection for this group.”

The Immigration Appeals Board’s director denied he would be adhering to the whitepaper because “the government has chosen not to instruct the UNE about some new practices in the form in which the government can direct the UNE, namely, through legislative change.”

In the case of Neda Ibrahim, lawyer Arild Humlen commented to The Foreigner he believes officials had a hidden agenda when expelling her and her family from Norway.

“I suspect the State feared the court would rule against them, and that is why authorities deported the family now. I expect the State will say this was purely a coincidence.”

“Nevertheless, the family’s been here for 11 years, stayed at a recognised address, and the children have gone to school for at least 10 of these. It was really just a question of a couple of days,” explained Mr Humlen.




Published on Wednesday, 12th June, 2013 at 20:09 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Shruti Chauhan   .
Last updated on 12th June 2013 at 20:25.

This post has the following tags: norwaydeportations, asylumseekersnorway.





  
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