New Norway government asylum policy gets mixed reception / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner New Norway government asylum policy gets mixed reception. Some believe the amnesty granted for some families still waiting for a decision on their asylum application will improve matters, others have problems with it. Norway currently has around 300 children who have resided in Norway for more than three years among this group. This week, the four non-socialist Parties reached an agreement on the way forward. Liberal Party (V) leader Trine Skei Grande told NRK she was “very proud” of what they had achieved. “Not particularly surprising”

norwayimmigration, norwayasylum



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New Norway government asylum policy gets mixed reception

Published on Wednesday, 2nd October, 2013 at 20:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith and Linn Schjerven      .
Last Updated on 2nd October 2013 at 21:49.

Some believe the amnesty granted for some families still waiting for a decision on their asylum application will improve matters, others have problems with it.



Norway currently has around 300 children who have resided in Norway for more than three years among this group. This week, the four non-socialist Parties reached an agreement on the way forward.

Liberal Party (V) leader Trine Skei Grande told NRK she was “very proud” of what they had achieved.

“Not particularly surprising”

Interest organisations for immigrants and asylum seekers differ in their opinions.

“The agreement isn’t revolutionary regarding Progress’ (FrP) asylum and immigration policy. This is the most moderate tightening we could have expected by a government that includes FrP,” said Rune Berglund Steen, Director of the Norwegian Centre Against Racism told Klassekampen, Wednesday.

Sylo Taraku, general secretary of LIM (Equality, Integration, and Diversity), said he views the agreement more of a liberalisation of present immigration policy than a tightening, “in sum”.

“Changes for asylum children mean that more people will be staying in Norway. I can’t see that some of the points will lead to more being rejected or sent out than presently. What’s presented as a tightening is small adjustments to Labour's (Ap) policy in reality,” he declared

Pointless?

Former asylum seekers’ case campaigner Mr Taraku, who was born in Kosovo, has recently criticised the present government’s asylum policy for being too generous.

“Asylum seekers stream into Norway. Over 70 per cent are granted residence. We may as well open the borders if this increases,” he told Vårt Land a week after September 9th’s general election.

A record number of asylum seekers entered Norway in August this year. Directorate of Immigration (UDI) figures showed this was 1,616.

This is the highest number of asylum seekers Norway has received in one month since September 2009, which saw 17,000, total. Almost 8,000 asylum seekers have come to Norway in 2013, an increase of 29 per cent on the same month last year.

Unwieldy

LIM’s Sylo Taraku also questions whether an increase past 70 per cent would warrant maintaining the UDI or Immigration Appeals Board (UNE), “which cost billions of kroners annually”.

At the same time, he advocates underage asylum seekers and their family be granted the amnesty now coming into force.

“Let them stay. But what’s important is that those receiving a final rejection on their application be sent out of the country quickly afterwards. It’s important to maintain the integrity of the asylum regime,” he said.

All change?

But whilst discussions as to the merits or drawbacks of the quad-Party amnesty agreement continue, current government politicians criticise it.

Outgoing Deputy Justice and Public Security Minister Pål Lønseth remarked he did not think it would be particularly effective.

“I don’t think we’re talking about very many families with children [that this would cover]. There will certainly be considerably fewer than there has been talk of.”

He opposes granting an amnesty to all families, arguing it would undermine the asylum system. This is something the Minister herself, Grete Faremo, voiced prior to the general election.

“They [the four non-socialist Parties] are discussing differential treatment towards a group that has chosen to not abide by the Norwegian government’s decision,” she told NRK at the time.

“Luck of the draw”

Ann-Margrit Austenå from the Norwegian Organisation for Asylum Seekers (NOAS) has doubts about the plans.

700 asylum seeker children currently reside in Norway, and she believes these measures still leave unanswered questions.

“There's a lot of uncertainty connected to when the [asylum] application was submitted and whether there is a return agreement [with the country of origin] or not.”

“This isn’t an amnesty. It’s a scheme that allows for a new type of lottery and uncertainty for many long-staying children,” she also remarked to Adressavisen




Published on Wednesday, 2nd October, 2013 at 20:48 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith and Linn Schjerven      .
Last updated on 2nd October 2013 at 21:49.

This post has the following tags: norwayimmigration, norwayasylum.





  
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