No top UNICEF places for Norway / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner No top UNICEF places for Norway. Standards for children in Norway are lower than some of its European counterparts, a new UNICEF (UN Children's Fund) report on the world’s rich countries shows. Norway has secured second place overall. It leads in the Nordics, with Iceland, Finland, Sweden and Denmark coming in 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 11th. However, top place is occupied by the Netherlands. UNICEF’s latest study, so-called ‘Report Card 11’, also shows Norway ranks 3rd in material wellbeing, 3rd in housing environment, 4th in behaviors and risks, 6th in education, and 7th in health and safety.

unicefreport, norwaychildren



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No top UNICEF places for Norway

Published on Thursday, 11th April, 2013 at 07:43 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.

Standards for children in Norway are lower than some of its European counterparts, a new UNICEF (UN Children's Fund) report on the world’s rich countries shows.



Norway has secured second place overall. It leads in the Nordics, with Iceland, Finland, Sweden and Denmark coming in 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 11th. However, top place is occupied by the Netherlands.

UNICEF’s latest study, so-called ‘Report Card 11’, also shows Norway ranks 3rd in material wellbeing, 3rd in housing environment, 4th in behaviors and risks, 6th in education, and 7th in health and safety.

These scores are lower than its Dutch European counterpart that comes 1st for three factors: material wellbeing, education wellbeing, and behavior and risks. Housing and environment and health and safety are given a four and five, respectively.

Finland beats Norway on three measurements, Iceland two, Sweden one, and Denmark one. Denmark has the lowest scores when it comes to children’s material wellbeing, health and safety, and housing and environment.

Further south in Europe, countries Greece Portugal, Spain, and Italy have been ranked towards the bottom half of the tables.

The study’s overall bottom four places, globally, include three of the poorest countries in the survey – Latvia, Lithuania and Romania. Perhaps surprisingly, the US comes in 26th place.

UNICEF’s survey reveals the relationship between the GDP and the welfare of children is not very strong.

Countries like Slovenia, Czech Republic and Portugal have ranked higher than the richer countries like Austria, Canada, and the US.

The findings so far, in the first decade of 2000, have been that problems like low family affluence rate, infant mortality rate, and the percentage of young people who smoke cigarettes, for example, have fallen in every single country for which data was available.

UNICEF’s report aims to set a standard for the poorer nations, and to indicate how failure to protect and promote the wellbeing of children is associated with increased risk of future societal problems.

“We need to know more about how children see and evaluate their own lives,” said UNICEF’s Gordon Alexander in a statement, “about what matters to them, and do this in a more systematic way.”

“Children's voices, even at a very young age are vital,” he concluded.



Published on Thursday, 11th April, 2013 at 07:43 under the news category, by Shruti Chauhan.

This post has the following tags: unicefreport, norwaychildren.





  
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