Nordics the most altruistic area in the world / News / The Foreigner

Nordics the most altruistic area in the world. The Good Country Index measures countries on what they each contribute to the ‘common good of humanity’. This index uses data gathered from the UN, the World Bank, and other international organisations to rank each country. The seven main areas include world order, international peace and security, and health and wellbeing.

humanitarian, aid, nordics



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Nordics the most altruistic area in the world

Published on Thursday, 26th June, 2014 at 19:34 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last Updated on 27th June 2014 at 07:16.

The Good Country Index measures countries on what they each contribute to the ‘common good of humanity’.

The flags of the Nordic countries
The five countries came top on the humanitarian front.The flags of the Nordic countries
Photo: Malene Thyssen/Wikimedia Commons


This index uses data gathered from the UN, the World Bank, and other international organisations to rank each country.

The seven main areas include world order, international peace and security, and health and wellbeing.

Finland came second on the overall index after the scores were added from all 35 indicators in each of the seven categories. Sweden came sixth, Norway eighth, Denmark ninth, and Iceland 17th.

The Nordic region was regarded as collectively making a contribution to the planet and humanity. This was the highest out of all areas of the world.

Ireland came top of the overall index. Countries scoring the lowest and ranking at the bottom of the index include Iraq, Vietnam, and Libya.

Areas and sub-categories:

  • Science and technology: International students, journal exports, international publications (2009), Nobel prizes, patents.
  • Culture: Creative goods exports, creative services exports, UNESCO dues in arrears as % of contribution, freedom of movement (i.e. visa restrictions), press freedom.
  • International peace and security: Peacekeeping troops, dues in arrears to UN peace keeping budgets, international violent conflict, arms exports, internet security (2012).
  • World order: Charity giving, refugees hosted, refugees generated, population growth, UN treaties signed.
  • Planet and climate: Biocapacity reserve (2009), hazardous waste exports (2011), organic water pollutant (BOD) emissions (2007), CO2 emissions, other greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Prosperity and equality: Open trading, UN volunteers abroad, fairtrade market size, FDI outflows, development assistance.
  • Health and wellbeing: Food aid, pharmaceutical exports, voluntary excess donations to the WHO, humanitarian aid donations, drug seizures.

British-born independent policy advisor Simon Anholt developed the ‘Good Country’ concept and the Good Country Index.

Robert Govers, a US-born scholar, built the Index with support from several other organisations and funded by Simon Anholt, according to Mssrs Anholt and Govers.

Some of the organisations and names credited in connection with the report are the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Peter Muller of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA), and the Global Footprint Network.

“The Good Country Index tries to measure how much each country on earth contributes to the planet and to the human race. It isn’t interested in how well countries are doing, it’s interested in how much they are doing,” the authors said.

A full statistics and rankings list of the 125 countries measured can be found here.




Published on Thursday, 26th June, 2014 at 19:34 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .
Last updated on 27th June 2014 at 07:16.

This post has the following tags: humanitarian, aid, nordics.





  
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