Norway British humour taste grows as broadcaster grows cold over Norway / News / The Foreigner

Norway British humour taste grows as broadcaster grows cold over Norway. Channel BBC Worldwide has been experiencing increasing success in Norway after its 2008 launch and 18-month-old remodelling. The same cannot be said for a famous Norwegian programme host over the North Sea. The BBC are planning to bring more programmes to its Norwegian audience including comedies such as quizzes QI and Would I Lie To You, as well as series Fresh Meat, the Inbetweeners and Little Britain. ‘Auntie’ has seen a 150 percent increase in its market share since. The BBC’s Jon Farrar believes that this is largely down to the comedy on the corporation’s channels.

fredrikskavlan, bbctv



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Norway British humour taste grows as broadcaster grows cold over Norway

Published on Friday, 8th March, 2013 at 21:22 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

Channel BBC Worldwide has been experiencing increasing success in Norway after its 2008 launch and 18-month-old remodelling. The same cannot be said for a famous Norwegian programme host over the North Sea.

Fredrik Skavlan
Fredrik Skavlan
Photo: Nordiske Mediedager/Flickr


The BBC are planning to bring more programmes to its Norwegian audience including comedies such as quizzes QI and Would I Lie To You, as well as series Fresh Meat, the Inbetweeners and Little Britain.

‘Auntie’ has seen a 150 percent increase in its market share since. The BBC’s Jon Farrar believes that this is largely down to the comedy on the corporation’s channels.

“I'll be a little careful characterising you now, but it’s evident that Norwegians and Brits have some of the same sense of humour”, he told Aftenposten, “I think we both like the slightly darker humour, often interspersed with irony, and we cultivate anti-heroes and losers.” The BBC will begin showing new series in Norway this month.

Meanwhile, Scandinavian talk-show host Fredrik Skavlan – SVT’s 2009 Programme Leader of the Year – has been a flop at the corporation, despite initial BBC enthusiasm.

The British broadcaster purchased two 2011 seasons, hoping to attract new viewers. Programmes were due to be shown on BBC Entertainment Nordic Countries-wide on Friday evenings instead of just Norway and Sweden, then subsequently to Finnish and Danish viewers on BBC Entertainment Norden.

Skavlan programme producer at Monkberry, Marianne Torp Kierulf said the BBC changing its mind “is no problem, because there are so many viewers on NRK and SVT.”

Some three million Norwegians and Swedes saw Mr Skavlan’s 2013 season premiere in January, Aftenposten reports.

The BBC’s Jon Farrar admits their strategic thinking was unsuccessful, however, with ratings lower than expected.

“It was an experiment, and we’re probably not going to repeat it,” he said.




Published on Friday, 8th March, 2013 at 21:22 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith and Michael Sandelson      .

This post has the following tags: fredrikskavlan, bbctv.





  
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