Norway coalition policies not an all-round Centre-Right hit / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway coalition policies not an all-round Centre-Right hit. The Christian Democratic (KrF) and Liberal (V) Parties have expressed dissatisfaction with the Conservative (H)-Progress (FrP) newly-released political platform. Knut Arild Hareide, leader of the Christian Democrats, was especially concerned with the rural and agricultural policy presented in the 75-page document. “I don’t regret that I didn’t join government. Parts of this platform would have made it difficult for me to sign [it],” he told TV2, Tuesday.

norwaygovernment, coalitionnorway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norway coalition policies not an all-round Centre-Right hit

Published on Tuesday, 8th October, 2013 at 21:40 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last Updated on 8th October 2013 at 21:52.

The Christian Democratic (KrF) and Liberal (V) Parties have expressed dissatisfaction with the Conservative (H)-Progress (FrP) newly-released political platform.



Knut Arild Hareide, leader of the Christian Democrats, was especially concerned with the rural and agricultural policy presented in the 75-page document.

“I don’t regret that I didn’t join government. Parts of this platform would have made it difficult for me to sign [it],” he told TV2, Tuesday.

Mr. Hareide also disagrees that shops should be open on Sundays, believing resources should be used in other areas instead.

The Christian Democratic leader does however believe that the Conservatives and Progress heeded his Party’s demands during the government negotiation meetings.

He was satisfied with the family and elderly care policies and that little change had been made to alcohol policy, however. 

“I am very pleased that the main political lines have been unchanged, given that we have been in talks with the Conservatives and Progress,” he stated.

The Liberals were surprised that the climate had not been considered a priority among the eight points in the political platform. 

“We are amazed that a government puts forward eight main points for Norway’s future, and does not take on the biggest challenge facing the world now,” leader Trine Skei Grande commented to NRK.

Liberal Party member Guri Melby expressed her disappointed concerning the document’s approach towards oil drilling.

This excludes areas outside Lofoten, Vesterålen and Senja, as these will remain untouched until 2017.                                                        

The platform states that the government will maintain a “predictable and high tempo’” when it comes to assigning new areas for petroleum activity.

“This shows why there wasn’t a four-Party government, but an agreement,” said Ms. Melby.

Ms. Melby was puzzled over Erna Solberg’s desire to extract oil at the same pace, as before while promising to make the Norwegian economy less dependent on oil.

The incoming Conservative Prime Minister commented that a dual Norwegian economy has no relation to how much oil will be pumped up from the Norwegian Continental Shelf, however.

She stated that a brake on oil activity would be the same as lowering welfare levels in Norway.



Published on Tuesday, 8th October, 2013 at 21:40 under the news category, by Linn Schjerven.
Last updated on 8th October 2013 at 21:52.

This post has the following tags: norwaygovernment, coalitionnorway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!