Norway government denies families further compensation for fatal air crash / News / The Foreigner

Norway government denies families further compensation for fatal air crash. Relatives of victims who died in the Grytøya air crash in northern Norway, will not be paid further damages from the State, the Defence Minister Anne-Grete Strøm-Eriksen declares. The Labour (Ap) politician says this was due to a lawsuit the families lost. High Court Judges ruled two years ago that the state held no responsibility for things conducted by the Commander of the Air Force and his subordinates. They were denied the possibility of appealing to the Supreme Court. The accident itself took place on 11 July 1972 when a Royal Norwegian Air Force DHC-6 Twin Otter, aircraft registration 67-056, crashed into a mountain on the island of Grytøya whilst on its way from Bardufoss.

norwayaircrash, grytoya, grytoeya



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Norway government denies families further compensation for fatal air crash

Published on Tuesday, 12th March, 2013 at 14:04 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.
Last Updated on 12th March 2013 at 16:35.

Relatives of victims who died in the Grytøya air crash in northern Norway, will not be paid further damages from the State, the Defence Minister Anne-Grete Strøm-Eriksen declares.

An equivalent Twin Otterplane taken in 2007 at Jarlsberg Airfield
An equivalent Twin Otterplane taken in 2007 at Jarlsberg Airfield
Photo: Mehamn/Wikipedia


The Labour (Ap) politician says this was due to a lawsuit the families lost. High Court Judges ruled two years ago that the state held no responsibility for things conducted by the Commander of the Air Force and his subordinates. They were denied the possibility of appealing to the Supreme Court.

The accident itself took place on 11 July 1972 when a Royal Norwegian Air Force DHC-6 Twin Otter, aircraft registration 67-056, crashed into a mountain on the island of Grytøya whilst on its way from Bardufoss.

All 17 aboard, many of them children, died after the pilot chose to ignore ATC warnings about bad weather.

He chose to continue on the original route filed in his flight-plan instead of proceeding to Bodø Airport as advised.

It was concluded that the pilot had been under the influence of alcohol at the time of the crash, with his alcohol problem being well-known.

The military had sat on information about the accident for 33 years, it was later revealed.

In a comment to NRK, Minister of Defence Anne-Grethe Strøm-Erichsen said that the families of the diseased were paid damages “after the fatal accident.”

The broadcaster’s documentary about the accident it screened in October last year showed that the MoD had withheld information regarding the cause of the incident.

Minister Strøm-Eriksen issued an apology to the families of the victims in the course of the documentary.



Published on Tuesday, 12th March, 2013 at 14:04 under the news category, by Asgeir Ueland.
Last updated on 12th March 2013 at 16:35.

This post has the following tags: norwayaircrash, grytoya, grytoeya.





  
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