Norway immigrants discouraged from culture / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norway immigrants discouraged from culture. Children with foreign ancestry are underrepresented in Norway’s cultural life, according to researchers. A report by IRIS (International Research Institute of Stavanger) personnel Anders Vassenden and Nils Asle Bergsgard ‘Et skritt tilbake?’ (A Step Back?) looks into how immigrant parents view feel about their children following a career in the performing arts. They found that many parents do not feel the performing arts create stability, and would rather their children enter one of the professions.

foreignersnorwayculture, immigrantslowstatusnorway



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norway immigrants discouraged from culture

Published on Wednesday, 23rd November, 2011 at 14:07 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

Children with foreign ancestry are underrepresented in Norway’s cultural life, according to researchers.



A report by IRIS (International Research Institute of Stavanger) personnel Anders Vassenden and Nils Asle Bergsgard ‘Et skritt tilbake?’ (A Step Back?) looks into how immigrant parents view feel about their children following a career in the performing arts.

They found that many parents do not feel the performing arts create stability, and would rather their children enter one of the professions.

“An artist is not considered to be a separate occupation in many environments,” Mr Vassenden says to NRK.

The researchers interviewed 20 people within the performing arts whose parents immigrated to Norway from places including Pakistan and Vietnam.

Actor and journalist Aesha Ullah, who is from a Pakistani background, tells the broadcaster that, “I grew up and became very interested in theatre, but my parents wanted me to get an academic education and have other hobbies. Arts occupations are not seen as financially stable.”

Though her parents “regard what I do as fun today” as she has managed “to prove to them that I succeeded”, she recognises many of the traits described by the researchers.

“Many [immigrants] have come to Norway with a desire to improve their economic and social situation. These wishes are then transferred to the second generation,” states Mr Vassenden, saying many parents regard the arts as a step back.



Published on Wednesday, 23rd November, 2011 at 14:07 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .

This post has the following tags: foreignersnorwayculture, immigrantslowstatusnorway.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!