Norway immigration affects labour market efficiency / News / The Foreigner

Norway immigration affects labour market efficiency. Mobility amongst immigrants has led to an evening-out of any regional differences in the labour market, a study by the Institute Social Research shows. “Immigrants who come to Norway are attentive to regional opportunities, and tend to relocate to other districts if the employment possibilities are more promising there,” said researchers Marianne Røed and Pål Schøne, who carried out the investigation. They added that immigrants are not as tied down to a region when they first arrive unlike native Norwegians, which may explain why they are more likely to move to another one.

norwayjobs, norwayimmigration, norwaylabourmarket



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Norway immigration affects labour market efficiency

Published on Tuesday, 31st July, 2012 at 12:23 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last Updated on 31st July 2012 at 14:04.

Mobility amongst immigrants has led to an evening-out of any regional differences in the labour market, a study by the Institute Social Research shows.

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Photo: Ed Yourdon/Flickr


“Immigrants who come to Norway are attentive to regional opportunities, and tend to relocate to other districts if the employment possibilities are more promising there,” said researchers Marianne Røed and Pål Schøne, who carried out the investigation.

They added that immigrants are not as tied down to a region when they first arrive unlike native Norwegians, which may explain why they are more likely to move to another one.

The researchers also explained that immigrants begin to settle down after 8-10 years, and like native Norwegians are less likely to move, but the labour market is always being affected due to continued immigration.

Their study examines three stages: the settlement pattern, the mobility between regions that follows this settlement pattern and the possible exit from the country.

“This kind of research may be especially important in a Norwegian context, as the natives are not inclined to excessive moving. There are no indications that natives contribute to greasing the wheels in the same way that immigrants do,” stated Pål Schøne.




Published on Tuesday, 31st July, 2012 at 12:23 under the news category, by Lyndsey Smith   .
Last updated on 31st July 2012 at 14:04.

This post has the following tags: norwayjobs, norwayimmigration, norwaylabourmarket.





  
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