Norway journalists publicize Breivik trial ID / News / The Foreigner

Norway journalists publicize Breivik trial ID. Just a days prior to the start of Anders Behring Breivik’s trial, some of the Norwegian journalists accredited to cover it shocked and concerned Oslo police by publicizing their court access cards online. The access cards consist of the bearer’s picture, profession, organization, date of birth and a so-called QR-Code that is scanned by security guards before the bearer enters Oslo District Court. Whilst some uploaded them to their Facebook profile, others writing for trade magazine Journalisten took pictures of them and published them in a picture series on the publication’s website. 

breiviktrial, oslodistrictcourt, andersbehringbreivik



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Norway journalists publicize Breivik trial ID

Published on Saturday, 14th April, 2012 at 21:28 under the news category, by The Foreigner.

Just a days prior to the start of Anders Behring Breivik’s trial, some of the Norwegian journalists accredited to cover it shocked and concerned Oslo police by publicizing their court access cards online.

Oslo District Courthouse (illus. ph.)
Oslo District Courthouse (illus. ph.)
Photo: WireImage/Ragnar Singsaas/Contributor


The access cards consist of the bearer’s picture, profession, organization, date of birth and a so-called QR-Code that is scanned by security guards before the bearer enters Oslo District Court.

Whilst some uploaded them to their Facebook profile, others writing for trade magazine Journalisten took pictures of them and published them in a picture series on the publication’s website. 

Their move means they can now be replicated and with the picture being replaced, thus causing a possible security breach. Everyone wishing to enter the premises now also has to bring extra identification.

Oslo police Chief of Staff John Fredriksen told Aftenposten, “This shows little understanding of the security regime in place.”

“We’ll have to come back with information regarding what measures we must implement. Nevertheless, I must say that it is acceptable for journalists to use their head, at least in relation to a case where the police and courthouse administration have spent so much time and resources to conduct the trial in a secure and dignified manner.”

Norwegian Press Association General Secretary Per Edgar Kokkvold terms the incident “distasteful”.

“I can defend a lot given the proper justification. I don’t see the point of doing this. It neither helps educate the public, nor does it contribute to improving journalism,’’ he said.

Calling what has happened “regrettable, unprofessional and undesirable”, Officer Fredriksen declared, “This is the problem with social media. Some people don’t see the whole picture regarding what they are doing and, at worst, how it could affect them and others.”

Oslo District Court has contacted the journalists concerned, and recalled their cards in order to make new ones.



Published on Saturday, 14th April, 2012 at 21:28 under the news category, by The Foreigner.

This post has the following tags: breiviktrial, oslodistrictcourt, andersbehringbreivik.





  
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