Norway man finds medieval coin from London / News / The Foreigner

Norway man finds medieval coin from London. The roughly 700-year-old silver coin was discovered on Lathari Beach in Northern Norway’s Alta municipality. Yngre Madsen, from Finnmark County’s Kviby found the coin whilst using a metal detector. It is engraved with the words ‘Civitas London’, which means City of London. Alta Museum staff also says that it is the world’s northernmost coin discovery.

medieval, coins, kingedward, metaldetector, paywall



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Norway man finds medieval coin from London

Published on Tuesday, 9th May, 2017 at 22:56 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan.
Last Updated on 11th May 2017 at 10:06.

The roughly 700-year-old silver coin was discovered on Lathari Beach in Northern Norway’s Alta municipality.

The rear side of the coin
The rear side of the coin
Photo: Alta Museum


Yngre Madsen, from Finnmark County’s Kviby found the coin whilst using a metal detector.

It is engraved with the words ‘Civitas London’, which means City of London. Alta Museum staff also says that it is the world’s northernmost coin discovery.

This is not the only coin from the same period and of the same type to have been discovered in the area, however.

In April 2013, just some hundred metres away to the east, Jahn Roald Kristiansen found a coin engraved with the words ‘Civitas Cantor’ (City of Canterbury).

Tor Inge Iversen and Roy Vidar Nilsen also discovered a similar coin bearing the words ‘Civitas London’ the following year.  

Each of coins found has been recognised to be part of the so-termed ‘Long Cross’ type.

These are said to have been characterised as originating from the reigns of King Edward I (1272—1307) and his son King Edward II (1307—1327).

The king’s name ‘EDW’ is also marked on them.

Coins made by King Edward I were marked with the names of 13 cities throughout England, while his son’s coins were marked with the names of five.

Though Norway had already developed its own national coin by 1050, coins from England were still used because of their high silver content.  

During the 1100s, coins made out of sterling silver such as these consisted of 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper. In those days, 240 pennies made one pound.



Published on Tuesday, 9th May, 2017 at 22:56 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan.
Last updated on 11th May 2017 at 10:06.

This post has the following tags: medieval, coins, kingedward, metaldetector, paywall.





  
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