Norway model still across the North Sea for Brexit Britain / News / The Foreigner

Norway model still across the North Sea for Brexit Britain. As Prime Minister Theresa May marches towards March 2017 and Article 50 invocation, UK politicians continue to um and ah about the viability of an EEA-EFTA-type deal. Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon of the SNP (Scottish National Party), has said that she will be publishing proposals keeping Scotland in the EU market via a Norway-style model in coming weeks. 62% of the Scottish public voted ‘Remain’ when over 30 million UK voters took to the polls on 23 June this year.

brexit, eu, eea, uk, scotland, wales, norway, ernasolberg, government, politics



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Norway model still across the North Sea for Brexit Britain

Published on Friday, 2nd December, 2016 at 12:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Bostock   .
Last Updated on 2nd December 2016 at 19:37.

As Prime Minister Theresa May marches towards March 2017 and Article 50 invocation, UK politicians continue to um and ah about the viability of an EEA-EFTA-type deal.

EU thumbs up or thumbs down?
EU thumbs up or thumbs down?
Photo: Swissmacky/Shutterstock Images


Scotland’s First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon of the SNP (Scottish National Party), has said that she will be publishing proposals keeping Scotland in the EU market via a Norway-style model in coming weeks.

62% of the Scottish public voted ‘Remain’ when over 30 million UK voters took to the polls on 23 June this year.

“If the UK is intent on a hard Brexit and coming out of the single market, I want to look at how we could, and I’m not for a minute saying there wouldn’t be challenges associated with this, but whether we could find a way of protecting Scotland’s place in the single market,” she said during a meeting of the Scottish Parliament’s conveners’ group.

“And of course models like EFTA, Norway is in EFTA, EFTA countries apart from Switzerland are also in the single market through the European Economic Area,” added Ms Sturgeon.

Backing from Wales

The EEA (European Economic Area) unites EU Member States and EFTA (European Free Trade Association) states – which include Norway, Finland, Iceland, and Liechtenstein – into an internal market joined by the same rules.

These allow goods, services, capital and persons to move about freely in the EEA, known as the four freedoms. Countries in the EEA have access to the single market, though they must accept these and pay into the EU budget.

Norway has access to the internal market through its membership of the European Economic Area, with around 80 per cent of its payments going into the EU. 60 per cent of imports are from EU member states.

The Scandinavian country makes a total annual contribution of around EUR 870 million a year. The money is not paid into the central EU budget.  Instead, most of it goes towards the poorer EU states and contributes to specific programmes.

Adam Price AM, of the Party of Wales (Plaid Cymru), shares Nicola Sturgeon’s idea of a Norway-style model.

According to him, his country should not miss the opportunity to consider this option if Scotland wins the right to remain a “Norway-style” member of the European single market.

No Entente Cordiale

The Labour Party has abstained on the motion for Scotland’s membership of the single market to be protected, however. Concerns were raised that this could lead to a second referendum on independence for Scotland from the UK.

Scottish Conservative finance minister Murdo Fraser, believes a Norway-style model is a “complete non-starter” for Scotland.

“Academics have warned again that this proposal would be the worst of all worlds, trapping Scotland in an EU-wide pact over which we would have no influence, and cutting us off from our biggest and nearest market in the rest of the UK” he commented to the BBC.

Moreover, The Scottish Conservatives have warned that the EEA plan could create tension between Scotland and the rest of the UK. Mr Fraser alleges the Norway-style consideration move is “dishonest spin from the SNP.”

“They know full well the EU would not allow Scotland to have a separate deal in the first place when the precedent that would go directly against the interests of some member states,” he told The Telegraph

Both Spain and France have slapped their respective kyboshes on giving Scotland special treatment regarding a deal.

And former Secretary of State for Wales, the Rt. Hon. David Jones MP, now a Brexit Minister, has said that he finds “it extremely difficult to see how one part of the United Kingdom could remain part of the single market while the rest was not.”

Toothless in Brussels

South of the border, Nick Clegg, current Brexit spokesperson for the Lib Dems, discounted the Norwegian model for Britain in the run-up to the referendum on Brexit.

While he is now in favour of it as a model for future UK-EU relations, he had argued that it was too costly, and that Norway had no power to cap migration.

“Everything gets decided by everybody else in Brussels, they then have to transpose it into law in Oslo.”

“[In Norway] they have no MEPs or EU Commissioners... no passport checks, they have no power whatsoever. All decisions are made by foreigners — utter powerlessness,” the Daily Mail quoted him as saying.

Moreover, Norway must abide by EU laws without having a decision in the EU, paying the same amount of money into the EU budget as the UK.      

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg, who expressed concerns about Britain’s Brexit, advised the nation against leaving the EU. She remarked to Politico that “they won’t like it”.

On the other side of the North Sea, David Davis, secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, confirms that the UK government would look at all options during the process of article 50 over the next two years.

According to him, Britain would consider making payments to the EU budget in return for access to EU markets.

“The major criterion here is that we get the best possible access for goods and services to the European market,” he stated, Thursday.



Published on Friday, 2nd December, 2016 at 12:51 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Sarah Bostock   .
Last updated on 2nd December 2016 at 19:37.

This post has the following tags: brexit, eu, eea, uk, scotland, wales, norway, ernasolberg, government, politics.





  
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