Norway Progress politician bets on Poker legislation change enthusiasm / News / The Foreigner

Norway Progress politician bets on Poker legislation change enthusiasm. The Progress Party’s (FrP) Erlend Wiborg will play Pot Limit Omaha (PLO) pro Ola Amundsgaard to liberalise the Scandinavian country’s gambling laws. Saturday’s game comes following Mr Wiborg MP’s decision to accept the apparent challenge from his fellow Norwegian, nicknamed “Odd Oddsen”. Both have a common interest in the 120-hour minimum heads up event, which actually takes place over seven months until 7 May 2014 with a not less than 20 hours a month. Broad political agreement

norwaypoker, norwaygambling, onlinepoker



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Norway Progress politician bets on Poker legislation change enthusiasm

Published on Thursday, 5th December, 2013 at 21:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Progress Party’s (FrP) Erlend Wiborg will play Pot Limit Omaha (PLO) pro Ola Amundsgaard to liberalise the Scandinavian country’s gambling laws.

Pack of playing cards
Pack of playing cards
Photo: Christian Gidlöf/Wikimedia Commons


Saturday’s game comes following Mr Wiborg MP’s decision to accept the apparent challenge from his fellow Norwegian, nicknamed “Odd Oddsen”.

Both have a common interest in the 120-hour minimum heads up event, which actually takes place over seven months until 7 May 2014 with a not less than 20 hours a month.

Broad political agreement

Reports say Mr Amundsgaard wants to illustrate that Poker is a game of skill, Mr Wiborg and his Party seek to make the game fully-legal.

The Rightists have already expressed their intention to do this in the bi-Party ‘Sundvolden Declaration’ between them, the Conservatives (H), Christian Democrats (KrF), and Liberals (V).

This agreement was hammered out following September’s Conservative-Progress general election victory.

It gets its name from the hotel in eastern Norway’s Buskerud County, where politicians met.

Doubtful         

Playing poker online and for with real cards are both banned under Norway’s current legislation.

“So we’re going to meet and play using two computers, which is perfectly legal,” Erlend Wiborg MP tells The Foreigner.

“But I’ve only played six or seven times in my life, Ola Amundsgaard is one of the best players in the world.”

What do you feel your chances of winning are?

“Not good at all,” says Mr Wiborg. “I expect I’ll probably lose fairly quickly.”

“For a good cause”

He adds neither of them is staking any money, “but I’ll be getting one million kroner if he loses, and will be donating all the money to charity.”

“People can vote for which one should receive this some at my personal blog. The most popular one in the poll wins.”

One million kroner equals roughly 162,800 thousand US dollars, or 119,680 euros, or 99,680 pounds sterling at today’s rate of exchange.

Broad national interest

Could Norway see a national Progress Party-Poker enthusiasm if you win, similar to what happened to chess in the run-up to Magnus Carlsen’s recent World Chess Champion success?

“Maybe, I certainly hope so. Poker is a great game for many people. 500,000 played in Norway last year,” says the MP.

“I also hope the upcoming match gets enough publicity in parliament so the Bill succeeds. The Liberals are certainly on the same side as us,” he explains.

Rather odd

The seven charities Progress’ Mr Wiborg has chosen are The Helpline for Gambling Addicts, alcohol and drug treatment and prevention organisation Blue Cross Norway, Save the Children Norway – Philippines, and Oslo-based charity organisation Fattighuset.

Completing the list are Human Rights Service – a Norwegian “non-partisan independent think tank” working with multi-ethnic and multi-religious themes in Norway and Europe – and a foundation called Rettferd for taperne. They work with those who feel they are disadvantaged, the sexually abused, as well as people without proper schooling.

“There are only three countries in the world today that ban online and table poker: Norway, Albania, and North Korea,” concludes Mr Wiborg.

The Wiborg-Amundsgaard Poker marathon starts with a live session at the Oslo Congress Centre.



Published on Thursday, 5th December, 2013 at 21:58 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwaypoker, norwaygambling, onlinepoker.





  
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