Norway refugee legislation inadequate / News / The Foreigner

Norway refugee legislation inadequate. The Norwegian Association of Asylum Seekers (NOAS) is calling on the government to improve health rights for paperless applicants. With record numbers of paperless people, also known as “irregular” or “undocumented” migrants, seeking medical attention, the Association fears current and future legislative failings. At present, only those with life-threatening conditions, or are psychologically unstable and considered to pose a potential risk, can get medical help. “Even though doctors and medical centres can give assistance beyond this, it’s imminent that people who need ordinary medical care receive it. Many just get painkillers and no real treatment,” NOAS legal advisor Andreas Furuseth tells The Foreigner.

norwegianassociationofasylumseekers, refugeemedicalhelpfailures, paperlessapplicants



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norway refugee legislation inadequate

Published on Monday, 10th October, 2011 at 14:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

The Norwegian Association of Asylum Seekers (NOAS) is calling on the government to improve health rights for paperless applicants.

Headache pills
Headache pills
Photo: sacks08/Flickr


With record numbers of paperless people, also known as “irregular” or “undocumented” migrants, seeking medical attention, the Association fears current and future legislative failings. At present, only those with life-threatening conditions, or are psychologically unstable and considered to pose a potential risk, can get medical help.

“Even though doctors and medical centres can give assistance beyond this, it’s imminent that people who need ordinary medical care receive it. Many just get painkillers and no real treatment,” NOAS legal advisor Andreas Furuseth tells The Foreigner.

The Red Cross and Kirkens Bymisjon run voluntary centres for everyone without a right to stay in Norway.

At a facility in Oslo, which opened two years ago, nobody is considered illegal. 500 have already been given help for conditions such as sore throats, painful shoulders, or even pregnancy checks. They expect 800 to visit this year, twice as many as in 2010, reports NRK.

Assuming the increase has been due to word-of-mouth, centre leader Solveig Holmedal Ottesen, is concerned many do not visit them, however, “because they are frightened of being reported by someone informing on them. I also believe many do not know they have a right to medical treatment, amongst others, those with contagious diseases.”

The government is now considering modifying legislation to include abortions, as well as giving children the same rights to healthcare as those who have received permission to stay in Norway.

However, NOAS’ Andreas Furuseth says, “We are concerned about government policy today, as well as future suggested amendments.”

“Under the new legislation, health facilities will have to bear the economic risk of treatment and assess if the patient has received a final refusal on their application for asylum. In reality, this will not really improve the situation at all,” he tells The Foreigner.



Published on Monday, 10th October, 2011 at 14:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwegianassociationofasylumseekers, refugeemedicalhelpfailures, paperlessapplicants.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!