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Norway top of the UNDP’s list. Huge differences between rich and poor countries. The latest Human Development Report (HDR) from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) shows Norway is again the world’s number one country to live in, after having trailed behind Iceland for two years running. Compiled using the most recent internationally comparable information from 2007, the so-called Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary indicator of people’s well-being, combining measures of life expectancy, literacy, school enrolment and GDP per head.A success story?

undp, hdr, hdi, united, nations, norway, jens, stoltenberg, jan, egeland, siv, jensen, human, development, index, 2009



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Norway top of the UNDP’s list

Published on Tuesday, 6th October, 2009 at 09:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 6th October 2009 at 16:35.

Huge differences between rich and poor countries.

Migrant workers fishing nr. harbor side
Migrant workers fishing nr. harbor side
Photo: Hussein Jinan/UNDP


The latest Human Development Report (HDR) from the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) shows Norway is again the world’s number one country to live in, after having trailed behind Iceland for two years running.

Compiled using the most recent internationally comparable information from 2007, the so-called Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary indicator of people’s well-being, combining measures of life expectancy, literacy, school enrolment and GDP per head.

A success story?

Reactions to the report’s findings ranged from being pleased to criticism.

Whilst Stoltenberg told NRK that he views the results as recognition of how Norway functions, the news didn’t come as a bolt from the blue for the director of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) Jan Egeland.

“Norway has almost set a world record for many years now when it comes to public and private consumption and investments. It’s no surprise that we’re in the top bracket. It also shows that Norway both has a well-organised society and a welfare system that more or less works,” he tells Stavanger Aftenblad.

The Progress Party’s (FrP) leader, Siv Jensen, used the occasion to focus on the problem of poverty at home by criticising the government for their policy in this area.

“Norway is a fantastic country to live in for many, but there are still plenty of people here who have a very tough time. Although we are rich country, we still can’t manage to look after those who are in most difficulty...We use the same medicine time and time again...(and) need to start using other methods,” says Jensen to Aftenblad.

Differences

And whilst this year’s data – collected in advance of the global economic crisis – puts Norway back on top, it also places Niger last.

“Despite significant improvements over time, progress has been uneven,” the UNDP writes in a statement.

“Many countries have experienced setbacks over recent decades, in the face of economic downturns, conflict-related crises and the HIV and AIDS epidemic. And this was before the impact of the current global financial crisis was felt.”

The report goes on to say that differences both in life-expectancy and income between the top and bottom of the table are huge. Whilst children born in Norway can expect to live to 80, those born in Niger have a life-expectancy of just 50 years. Each Norwegian child earns USD 85 for every USD 1 in Niger.

Calculations were made for 182 countries and territories, giving this year’s HDI the most extensive coverage ever.

Here are some of the results in comparison to 2006:

 

Top ten

Bottom ten

1.  Norway

173. Guinea-Bissau (↑1)

2.  Australia

174. Burundi (↑1)

3.  Iceland

175. Chad (↓2)

4.  Canada

176. Congo (Dem. Rep. of the) (↑1)

5.  Ireland

177. Burkina Faso (↓1)

6.  The Netherlands (↑1)

178. Mali (↑1)

7.  Sweden (↓1)

179. Central African Republic (↓1)

8.  France (↑3)

180. Sierra Leone

9.  Switzerland

181. Afghanistan

10. Japan

182. Niger



Published on Tuesday, 6th October, 2009 at 09:07 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 6th October 2009 at 16:35.

This post has the following tags: undp, hdr, hdi, united, nations, norway, jens, stoltenberg, jan, egeland, siv, jensen, human, development, index, 2009.





  
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