Norway’s Røros nice and chilly / News / The Foreigner

Norway’s Røros nice and chilly. Getting out of bed to the pre-news sound of Siberia in your slippers early on a winter morning is perhaps difficult at the best of times. As you steer your posterior towards the potentially coldish lavatory seat, though, thank the under-floor heating installer and be grateful you do not live in Røros permanently at this time of year. The town in Sør-Trøndelag County is situated just below the tail of Norway’s tadpole. Røros, a former parish until its 1 January 1838 establishment as a municipality too, gets its name from the old Røraas farm it was built on in around 1530. Like the Norwegian skiing style ‘Slalom’ (‘sla’ and ‘lom’), it comprises two names. ‘Røa’ is the name of the local river, and ‘os’ means ‘mouth of a river’.

norwaycold, coldtemperaturesnorway, roeros



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Norway’s Røros nice and chilly

Published on Thursday, 6th December, 2012 at 14:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 6th December 2012 at 15:34.

Getting out of bed to the pre-news sound of Siberia in your slippers early on a winter morning is perhaps difficult at the best of times. As you steer your posterior towards the potentially coldish lavatory seat, though, thank the under-floor heating installer and be grateful you do not live in Røros permanently at this time of year.

Røros winter market in the sun (2007)
Røros winter market in the sun (2007)
Photo: Hogne/Wikimedia Commons


The town in Sør-Trøndelag County is situated just below the tail of Norway’s tadpole. Røros, a former parish until its 1 January 1838 establishment as a municipality too, gets its name from the old Røraas farm it was built on in around 1530.

Like the Norwegian skiing style ‘Slalom’ (‘sla’ and ‘lom’), it comprises two names. ‘Røa’ is the name of the local river, and ‘os’ means ‘mouth of a river’.

The timber-housing town, with its various accommodation options, also boasts a mining area – one of two mining towns in Norway, the other being Kongsberg (silver) – and was established in 1646. It has been on UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites since about 1980.

Visitors can also go to see the church – completed in 1784 – the Olavsgruva mine, and the Smelthytta (smelt hut) museum, amongst other things. Its exhibitions are connected to the history of Røros Copperworks.

The Flanderborg part of town, Hyttklokka site – where Smelthytta workers were informed of work start/stop times – Kvikne Copper Mine, and Slegghaugan await tourists as part of the selection too. Slag (slegg) is a byproduct of copper smelting.

Moreover, for the nature-lovers, there are the area’s Femundsmarka and Forollhogna National Parks. The day can be continued or rounded off by visiting Røros’ restaurants, cafés, mountain farm food tasting establishments, pubs, and a disco.

A trip to the Skariskodden plant preservation area – which contains Norway's rarest plant, the Siberian Aster (Aster Sibiricus) – might turn readers’ thoughts to the winter season.

Some things to do at that time of year are cross-country and/or alpine skiing, snow kiting, dog-sledding, sleigh rides, and Sami culture and history experiences. Camping is on offer too in the winter, believe it or not.

It is cold in Røros this time of year, however. 4 am readings over the past few days have ranged from -26oC to -22oC, which can seem like an Arctic affair regarding temperatures to our readers. Everything is relative, of course, but summer it definitely is not.

The Foreigner asked the weathermen at Norway’s Met Office in Oslo why Røros is particularly cold compared with temperatures in several other places.

“There is no solar warming at this time of year, only loss of heat into the atmosphere, so it cools the lower parts in the area,” says on-duty meteorologist Arild Mentzoni. “Temperatures in the inner part of southern Norway usually get like this on clear and calm days such as we are experiencing at the moment.”

“We’ve also currently got cold air coming from the northeast, which means cooling continues when it stops here,” he adds.

According the Mr Mentzoni, no snow actually means it is warmer at the moment than what temperatures can be. -35oC to -40oC is not unusual.

The topography is also a contributory factor. Temperatures are normally colder in the valleys, “which are always colder than the mountain tops, apart from local variations.”

What is the coldest it has ever been in Røros, then?

“I think it was around -50.4oC in 1914”, replies Mr Mentzoni, “but the all-time record was in Karasjok [in northern Norway’s Finnmark County]. It got down to -51.4oC on 1 January 1886, the current record in Norway.”

An English-language tourist guide to Røros can be found here (external link).



Published on Thursday, 6th December, 2012 at 14:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 6th December 2012 at 15:34.

This post has the following tags: norwaycold, coldtemperaturesnorway, roeros.


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