Norwegian being parked as a teaching language / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian being parked as a teaching language. Management school swaps to English in classrooms. In an effort to attract foreign students to Norway and to give home-grown ones an advantage in the international employment market, the Norwegian School of Management (BI) in Oslo is substituting Norwegian with English in the classroom.Most degree-programmes “We’d like to become one of the best management schools in Europe. Both an international environment and English as a language are important if that’s going to happen,” Janne Marie Log, the school’s director of communications tells The Foreigner.

norwegian, school, management, oslo, english, classroom, teaching, jobs, benefit, international, competition



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norwegian being parked as a teaching language

Published on Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 at 18:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Management school swaps to English in classrooms.

BI Oslo
BI Oslo
Photo: Kai Myhre


In an effort to attract foreign students to Norway and to give home-grown ones an advantage in the international employment market, the Norwegian School of Management (BI) in Oslo is substituting Norwegian with English in the classroom.

Most degree-programmes

“We’d like to become one of the best management schools in Europe. Both an international environment and English as a language are important if that’s going to happen,” Janne Marie Log, the school’s director of communications tells The Foreigner.

But this is not altogether new. Their MSc degree courses have been taught in English since the beginning of the ‘90s, and today’s policy was introduced for most of their other Master’s degrees five years ago.

Competition

Although she couldn’t give any examples of how their policy has benefitted past students, Log believes the move gives Norwegian students access to jobs abroad and helps Norwegian-based businesses compete internationally, as a sound knowledge of English is a prerequisite in many professions.

International students benefit too, according to Log.

“At the same time, we wish to attract international students and supply English-speaking international students to Norwegian businesses,” she says.

BI currently has students attending their courses from over 99 countries.



Published on Wednesday, 30th September, 2009 at 18:55 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwegian, school, management, oslo, english, classroom, teaching, jobs, benefit, international, competition.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!