Norwegian child poverty fell under Leftists / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian child poverty fell under Leftists. Child poverty in Norway decreased from 9.6% in 2008 to 5.3% in 2012, figures from UNICEF show. “This is an extremely welcome turn of events for Norwegian children. It’s remarkable that the proportion of children growing up in absolute poverty in Norway is almost halved in four years” Ivar Stokkereit from UNICEF ​​Norway told Vårt Land. Axel West Pedersen, a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Social Research, comments that the UNICEF report shows how poorer families in Norway have seen their real incomes grow since the 2008 financial crisis.

poverty, children, norway



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Norwegian child poverty fell under Leftists

Published on Tuesday, 4th November, 2014 at 10:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

Child poverty in Norway decreased from 9.6% in 2008 to 5.3% in 2012, figures from UNICEF show.

Handful of kroner
Handful of kroner
Photo: aslakr/Flickr


“This is an extremely welcome turn of events for Norwegian children. It’s remarkable that the proportion of children growing up in absolute poverty in Norway is almost halved in four years” Ivar Stokkereit from UNICEF ​​Norway told Vårt Land.

Axel West Pedersen, a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Social Research, comments that the UNICEF report shows how poorer families in Norway have seen their real incomes grow since the 2008 financial crisis.

“Things have not gotten materially worse for children in poor Norwegian families following the financial crisis, unlike in many other rich countries. They have participated in economic growth, although not as quickly as the large middle class [has],” he said.

The Centre-Left coalition steered a successful macroeconomic policy after the financial crisis.

According to Mr Pedersen, this helped shield poor children from experiencing an economic decline.

However, Socialist Left (SV) Party leader Audun Lysbakken commented in an interview with Vårt Land that “we [the tri-partite coalition] didn’t completely achieve our objectives.”

“There’s a lot left to do. A child poverty rate of five per cent is still too high. We resolved to eradicate child poverty, but without agreeing on the measures.”

Other countries such as have also made good progress with tackling child poverty in the four-year period.

Chile comes top of the table, having decreased the rate from 31.4 to 22.8% (a decline of 8.67%) – all figures anchored in 2008.

Poland is second with a 22.4-14.5% change (-7.9%). Third is Australia, having reduced the child poverty rate from 19.2-13% (-6.27%).

Slovakia and Switzerland come fourth and fifth, respectively. Their rates were 16.7-11.1% (down 5.6%), and 19.5-14.7% (-4.8%).

UNICEF’s 41-country child poverty report also shows Nordic Country Norway came fifth (-4.3%). Others Sweden, Denmark, and Iceland are placed 13th, 24th, and 41st in the league table.

The figures for the respective countries are 12.9-12.1% (a 0.8% decline), 9.1-10.2% (up 1.1%), and 11.2-31-6% (an increase of 20.4%).

Joining Iceland in the bottom-five are 37th-place Ireland (18-28.6% (+10.6%)), Croatia (38th/15.8-27.6%/+11.8%), Latvia (39th/23.6-38.2%/+14.6%), and Greece (40th/23-40.5%/17.5%).



Published on Tuesday, 4th November, 2014 at 10:40 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .

This post has the following tags: poverty, children, norway.





  
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