Norwegian fantasy literature on the increase / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian fantasy literature on the increase. The genre has proved to be popular among Norwegian readers but the charts have been dominated by books written in English. These books’ popularity is thought to be linked to films and TV series based on works such as J.R.R. Tolkien’s ‘Lord of the Rings’ from 1954. Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ from 1865 is another extremely famous book. A British musical film version based on the book was made in 1972. American Tim Burton also directed a live action/computer-animated film in 2010.

fantasybooks, norwegianliterature



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Norwegian fantasy literature on the increase

Published on Sunday, 26th January, 2014 at 09:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last Updated on 26th January 2014 at 09:41.

The genre has proved to be popular among Norwegian readers but the charts have been dominated by books written in English.

Odin og Völven
An undead völva, a Scandinavian seeress, tells the spear-wielding god Odin of what has been and what will be in Odin and the Völva by Lorenz Frølich (1895)Odin og Völven
Photo: Lorenz Frølich (1820–1908)/W. Commons


These books’ popularity is thought to be linked to films and TV series based on works such as J.R.R. Tolkien’s ‘Lord of the Rings’ from 1954.

Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ from 1865 is another extremely famous book. A British musical film version based on the book was made in 1972. American Tim Burton also directed a live action/computer-animated film in 2010.

More contemporary works include George R.R. Martin’s ‘Game of Thrones’ (1996), also a TV series that started in 2011, Susanna Clarke’s ‘Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, and Lev Grossman’s ‘The Magicians’ (2009).

Now, there is a rise in Norwegian fantasy writing.

Martin Fyrileiv from Nord-Trøndelag County’s Namsos is about to release the first in a trilogy titled Bergtatt, centred around a 12-year-old boy.

“This is becoming increasingly popular, and I want to help create a new fantasy tradition in Norway. There is very little that is written based on Norse mythology,” he told NRK.

ARK bookshop chain’s Marit Grue says they observe rising numbers of books authored by Norwegian writers.

Norwegian academic Gerd Karin Omdal at Trondheim’s Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) says the fictional genre is clearly popular amongst those aged 12-20.

She argues that adolescents immersing themselves in another world and taking a pause from reality is beneficial, because the period “is a time that is often unstable and difficult for many.”

Oxford Dictionaries from Oxford University Press (OUP) defines fantasy as a “genre of imaginative fiction involving magic and adventure, especially in a setting other than the real world”.

The word ‘fantasy’ derives from the Latin word ‘phantasia’ (imagination), and the Old French Word ‘fantasie’, amongst others.




Published on Sunday, 26th January, 2014 at 09:05 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson and Lyndsey Smith      .
Last updated on 26th January 2014 at 09:41.

This post has the following tags: fantasybooks, norwegianliterature.





  
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