Norwegian Immigration Appeals Board faces new court case / News / The Foreigner

The Foreigner Norwegian Immigration Appeals Board faces new court case. Deported asylum seekers are suing officials for allegedly contravening European legislation and abuse of power. 12-year-old Neda Ibrahim and her family were sent out of Norway back to Jordan last year after police broke into their residence. Their actions caused widespread condemnation. Neda, her father and mother Said and Romah, and siblings Nael, 11, 9-year-old Dima, and Zoher, 5, were living in Dale asylum seekers’ reception centre in Sandnes municipality, western Norway.

norwayasylum, asylumseekersnorway, norwayimmigration



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

Norwegian Immigration Appeals Board faces new court case

Published on Thursday, 6th February, 2014 at 14:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

Deported asylum seekers are suing officials for allegedly contravening European legislation and abuse of power.



12-year-old Neda Ibrahim and her family were sent out of Norway back to Jordan last year after police broke into their residence. Their actions caused widespread condemnation.

Neda, her father and mother Said and Romah, and siblings Nael, 11, 9-year-old Dima, and Zoher, 5, were living in Dale asylum seekers’ reception centre in Sandnes municipality, western Norway.

The family was deported after UNE (Immigration Appeals Board) officials had turned down their five appeal attempts against rejection of their asylum application.

Authorities claimed the Ibrahims, who had been living in Norway for some 10 years at that time, had provided incorrect information as to their identities.

The family had also filed a lawsuit against the UNE. They argued officials had not considered the best interests of children when having turned the family’s appeals down during the process and had given more weight to immigration policy.

Their case concerned the children’s connection to Norway after years of residency, the UNE having made no individual assessment, Nael’s health situation, and Jordan’s situation due to an influx of displaced persons from Syria. Oslo District Court judges ruled in favour of the family.

However, the UNE made a new decision to deport the Ibrahims – who are still in Jordan – instead of taking the judgement further to the Court of Appeal as they should have done according to procedure, reports Nettavisen.

Lawyer Arild Humlen is preparing the lawsuit on behalf of his clients. He believes the UNE and the state have set aside Norway’s administrative laws, the European Convention on Human Rights, and not looked in matter of the child’s interests properly as Norway’s Children’s Act requires.

“The case concerns the abuse of authority, and it raises a number of principal legal questions,” Mr Humlen told the publication, Thursday.

UNE head of section Anne Brandt-Hansen remarked to NRK that “the case has been processed by the UNE and the UNE sees no basis for a different assessment than what is stated in the UNE's recent decision.”

Proceedings could begin this summer.



Published on Thursday, 6th February, 2014 at 14:35 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: norwayasylum, asylumseekersnorway, norwayimmigration.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!