Norwegian Muslims asked to donate blood for Muharram / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian Muslims asked to donate blood for Muharram. Norway’s increasingly multicultural society also means upped demand for different blood types. Foreigners were not always welcome as blood donors. Muslims in Norway are now being encouraged to donate blood as part of a campaign surrounding the Islamic holy month of Muharram. The ‘Gi blod for Hussain’ (Give for blood for Hussain) campaign aims to respect the death of Imam Hussain, and regards this as being a sacrificial moment for justice and equality.

muslims, islam, religion, blooddonor, health, paywall



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norwegian Muslims asked to donate blood for Muharram

Published on Sunday, 22nd January, 2017 at 12:15 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan and Michael Sandelson   .

Norway’s increasingly multicultural society also means upped demand for different blood types. Foreigners were not always welcome as blood donors.

Blood bags
Blood bags
Photo: Pixabay/Public Domain


Muslims in Norway are now being encouraged to donate blood as part of a campaign surrounding the Islamic holy month of Muharram.

The ‘Gi blod for Hussain’ (Give for blood for Hussain) campaign aims to respect the death of Imam Hussain, and regards this as being a sacrificial moment for justice and equality.

Imam Hussain (Husayn ibn Ali), an important figure in the Shia community and month of Muharram, was believed to be the third Imam (leader) of the Shia community, and third grandson of the prophet Muhammad.

The army of the Caliph Yazid killed Imam Husayn at the Battle of Karbala in Iraq on 10th October 680 AD (10th of Muharram, 61 AH of the Islamic calendar).

Muharram, which marks the holy day of Ashura, is known for being the second-holiest month after Ramadan.

According to the Islamic calendar, the holy day in Muharram is celebrated on the 10th day, and is known as the day of mourning.

Both Sunni and Shia Muslims celebrate this day as it signifies the sacrifice of Imam Hussain Ali. After this, Sunni and Shia Muslims became divided.

Norwegian doctor Ali Rizvi, one of those involved in the initiative, explains that the campaign is not an attempt to shame others but, rather, a way of reaching out.

Moreover, Islam is no argument against donating blood, he also tells publication Vårt Land.

“Helping people is central to Islam. But many are perhaps afraid of giving blood because they don’t know what it entails. We hope to break some barriers down by referring to a historical person who is known to both Shia and Sunni Muslims.”

The campaign also will also increase the amount of other blood types available, as Norway’s foreign population grows.

The Scandinavian country’s regulations excluded foreigners from giving blood up until the early 2000s, though certain restrictions applied.

These regarded people living in countries with the Chagas disease (also known as American trypanosomiasis), as well as those who had lived in Norway for less than three years and who did not understand Norwegian.

A blood donation quarantine period of six months also applied to Norwegians who returned home after having lived abroad for more than a year, with a total ban placed on men who had had sex with men.

Immigrants born in large parts of Asia and Africa – even after having lived in Norway for some 35 years – as well as so-termed ethnic

Norwegians who had sexual partners from these regions were also barred from being blood donors.

These rules were imposed due to risks such as malaria, hepatitis B and C, and HIV, which can be contracted via blood transfusion.

The ‘Gi blod for Hussain’ campaign has been running since 2015. Doctor Ali Rizvi comments that “blood type B is not common in the ethnic Norwegian population, but is found to a greater extent in people from the Middle East and Asia.”

“We’re becoming an increasingly multicultural society and need this blood type. Few immigrants in Norway give blood and we want to do something about this,” he concludes.

Muharram 2017 begins in the evening of 20th September and ends in the evening of Friday 20th October (dates may vary).

People who can donate blood

  • Those in good health
  • Those between 18 and 6o (first-timers)
  • First-timers 60 and above at the discretion of the blood bank’s doctors
  • Blood donors over 65 with annual permission from the blood bank’s doctors
  • Demands including weight, blood pressure, haemoglobin, which medicines are being taken apply
  • Blood donors must not be in a group at risk of getting HIV, hepatitis, or other illnesses/diseases that can be transferred via blood transfusion

Those who cannot donate blood

  • Persons who are ill
  • With certain illnesses/diseases which can either mean permanent, or temporary exclusion
  • People taking regular medicine (excluding the pill, allergy medicine, for low metabolism, for example)
  • Geographical criteria for exclusion: a real risk of infection based on epidemiological conditions in different countries. Country where born or brought up, and shorter or longer stays in some countries mean permanent exclusion. Stays in other countries may mean temporary exclusion
  • Persons belonging to a risk group for spreading infectious diseases that can be transmitted by blood transfusion. This applies to the use of doping agents or narcotics injected with syringes, prostitutes, and men who have sex with men
  • N.B. The Directorate of Health has decided that men who have had sex with men, and persons who have sold sexual services will be able to be accepted as blood donors provided they have not had sex with another person for 12 months prior to doing so. The new rules will come into effect following discussions with the blood donor service.

(Sources: Norwegian Directorate of Health, Wikipedia)



Published on Sunday, 22nd January, 2017 at 12:15 under the news category, by Charlotte Bryan and Michael Sandelson   .

This post has the following tags: muslims, islam, religion, blooddonor, health, paywall.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!