Norwegian ship hijacking averted / News / The Foreigner

Norwegian ship hijacking averted. Tanzanian marines foiled an attempted pirate hijacking on a Norwegian-registered ship, Tuesday. The seven pirates attacked the 228-metre long ‘Ocean Rig Poseidon’ drillship at approximately 08:00 as she was sailing approximately 23 Nautical Miles southeast of Mafia Island. Information received from the Surface and Marine Transport Regulatory Authority (SUMATRA) and the vessel’s owners suggests the armed attack was mounted from a small boat, according to NTB.Troubled seas

somalipirates, norwegianshiphijackingtanzania, operationoceanshield



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norwegian ship hijacking averted

Published on Wednesday, 5th October, 2011 at 22:56 under the news category, by John Price and Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan   .
Last Updated on 5th October 2011 at 23:20.

Tanzanian marines foiled an attempted pirate hijacking on a Norwegian-registered ship, Tuesday.

Orion P-3N aircraft sent to help NATO
Orion P-3N aircraft sent to help NATO
Photo: Forsvarets mediesenter/Torbjørn Kjosvold


The seven pirates attacked the 228-metre long ‘Ocean Rig Poseidon’ drillship at approximately 08:00 as she was sailing approximately 23 Nautical Miles southeast of Mafia Island.

Information received from the Surface and Marine Transport Regulatory Authority (SUMATRA) and the vessel’s owners suggests the armed attack was mounted from a small boat, according to NTB.

Troubled seas

News24 reports a South African crewmember, one of up to 25, said they “started firing with AK47s and assault rifles” after climbing aboard.

“It was initially terrifying because everything happened so quickly… even now, we are not calm”, said the individual, who wished to remain anonymous.

“The Marines guarding the ship and security personnel on board answered the assault by returning fire, overpowering the attackers and then took them prisoner,” SUMATRA writes. It is unconfirmed whether one pirate was shot in the leg.

Carrying onboard arms only recently became legal for Norwegian-registered ships following much debate, with ship owners adopting, sometimes advocating drastic measures.

To help combat the growing problem of Somali piracy around the Horn of Africa, Norway, who is in favour of pirate prosecutions, sent 39 soldiers and a high-tech Orion P-3N aircraft equipped with advanced electronics last month.

Stationed in the Seychelles at “Camp Skare, named after officer Siri Skare killed in Afghanistan earlier this year, they are at NATO’s disposal as part of UK-based Operation Ocean Shield, launched in 2009. The facility is approximately 2.5 hours flying time from the Gulf of Aden.

Their mission is to identify the pirates’ bases, monitor their vessels, and report to NATO’s four warships operating off Africa’s eastern coast and in the Indian Ocean when pirates are readying for sortie.

In a measure designed for prevention rather than cure, the details also include how many are aboard, as well as what type of weaponry they are carrying. Personnel are not required to arrest pirates in Somalia.

“An unpleasant record”

According to NRK, the mission is not without its dangers. Heavily armed militia groups, including hard-line Islamist faction al-Shabaab that took control of large parts of Somalia after the country’s government effectively collapsed in the early 1990s, operate in the region. The group has self-proclaimed links with al-Qaida.

Whilst it is believed Somali pirates mainly have handguns and rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs), militias pose a greater threat.

NATO’s maritime headquarters representative, Lasse Marhaug, warns, “It’s possible there are anti-aircraft weapons in the area if one flies in the direction of the coastline.” He also believes the Somalia’s militia groups have heat-seeking missiles.

Approximately 20,000 ships, 1,000 of them Norwegian-owned, pass through the Gulf of Suez and Gulf of Aden every year.

12 had been hijacked by the beginning of this month, and the pirates are holding about 280 women and men prisoner whilst ransom negotiations continue.

“2011 is moving towards setting an unpleasant record, with 160 attacks in the first half of the year,” says Norwegian military special advisor Ole Morten Sandqvist.  

The Orion plane and military personnel are expected to return home in the middle of December.




Published on Wednesday, 5th October, 2011 at 22:56 under the news category, by John Price and Nicoleta Dumitrache Sincan   .
Last updated on 5th October 2011 at 23:20.

This post has the following tags: somalipirates, norwegianshiphijackingtanzania, operationoceanshield.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!