Norwegians critical to own drinking culture / News / The Foreigner

Norwegians critical to own drinking culture. Drunk and violent Norwegians in many places are a common sight when going out for the evening in the weekend. A majority blame the nightspots and their own culture, according to a new national inquiry from the Directorate of Health. Seven out of ten Norwegians tell the Directorate of Health (Helsedirektoratet) they feel the numbers of drunken people are too high, and believe nightspots serve excessive amounts of alcohol to drunken people illegally. Strict Solfrid Kristoffersen, advisor at the Directorate, tells The Foreigner the law is quite clear.

directorate, health, helsedirektoratet, study, drinking, drink, drunk, violence, norwegians, anne-grete, stroem-erichsen, solfrid, kristoffersen, actis, sten, magne, berglund, intoxicated, alcohol



The Foreigner Logo

The Foreigner is an online publication for English speakers living or who have an interest in Norway. Whether it’s a glimpse of news or entertainment you’re after, there’s no need to leave your linguistic armchair. You don’t need to cry over the demise of the English pages of Aftenposten.no, The Foreigner is here!

Norske nyheter på engelsk fra Norge. The Foreigner er en engelskspråklig internett avis for de som bor eller som er interessert i Norge.

Google+ Google+ Twitter Facebook RSS RSS



News Article

LATEST:

}

Norwegians critical to own drinking culture

Published on Friday, 26th November, 2010 at 15:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last Updated on 26th November 2010 at 21:43.

Drunk and violent Norwegians in many places are a common sight when going out for the evening in the weekend. A majority blame the nightspots and their own culture, according to a new national inquiry from the Directorate of Health.

Norwegian Nøgne Ø Tyttebær beer
Norwegian Nøgne Ø Tyttebær beer
Photo: Bent Rostad/Flickr


Seven out of ten Norwegians tell the Directorate of Health (Helsedirektoratet) they feel the numbers of drunken people are too high, and believe nightspots serve excessive amounts of alcohol to drunken people illegally.

Strict

Solfrid Kristoffersen, advisor at the Directorate, tells The Foreigner the law is quite clear.

“Licensed bars, pubs, nightclubs and restaurants are not allowed to serve alcohol in a way deliberately designed to get people drunk, for example by dispensing excessively high amounts in short space of time.”

She says current licensing laws also place a high degree of responsibility on establishments.

“They cannot admit people who are obviously under the influence of alcohol, and are obliged to escort people off the premises who exhibit signs of drunkenness. This applies to those who have problems focusing, standing or walking straight, or if their speech is slightly slurred. Nightspots are also obliged to help people home, not just leave them in the road outside.”

However, appeals for better municipal control of establishments that contravene the law from NGO the Norwegian Policy Network on Alcohol and Drugs (Actis), have so far fallen on governmental deaf ears. Deputy Secretary General Sten Magne Berglund is highly critical.

“The current situation is totally unacceptable, and I believe the government and local authorities have a responsibility to solve the problem. Our cities are currently public vomitoriums,” he says.

Risk

As well as posing a health risk, excessive alcohol can lead to violence, injuries, and accidents, according to Solfrid Kristoffersen. Police say they see this all too often.

“We have a huge problem regarding drunkenness and violence every weekend in Oslo. We can easily see clear connections between violence and serving times in our city. I’d welcome governmental measures to exert more pressure on local authorities to introduce a national ban from 02:00,” Deputy Chief of Police Roger Andresen tells Vårt Land.

Minister of Health Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen says the government is not currently considering reducing serving times by an hour, though.

The Institute for Alcohol and Drug Research (SIRUS) is studying the links between serving times and violence in 30 Norwegian towns and cities, and the Minister says she would like to wait until all the facts are on the table.

This concerns Deputy Chief of Police Andresen.

“We have seen very little willingness by the government to do something about the problem so far. We hope it will alter.”




Published on Friday, 26th November, 2010 at 15:30 under the news category, by Michael Sandelson   .
Last updated on 26th November 2010 at 21:43.

This post has the following tags: directorate, health, helsedirektoratet, study, drinking, drink, drunk, violence, norwegians, anne-grete, stroem-erichsen, solfrid, kristoffersen, actis, sten, magne, berglund, intoxicated, alcohol.





  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!